Gen 3 Hayabusa




Yellow09

Registered
Notice the front end suspension and the location of the calipers?
Only present in the last picture.

The other pictures it had the same front end as the current bike.

Other companies played around and use the tele lever front suspension to some degree (BMW) but on their dedicated sport bikes they use the standard cartridge style front suspension.

IF Suzuki makes a Gen 3 Hayabusa, I'd imagine they would use a beefed up GSXR suspension.
 

fallenarch

THE SLOW RIDER
Registered
BMW uses a double wish bone suspension that is much like the suspension on a race car. It separates the turning and braking forces allowing you to turn and brake at the same time and it gets rid of dive. This actually takes getting used to but works extremely well and is the perfect touring arrangement. It also happens to be lighter and, since the front suspension is a shock not a fork, is more durable in theory (BMW front shocks leak, lol).

They don't use this on the sport bikes because forks have the ability to change the bike's geometry to turn better when the bike is braking (the diving). So forks work better for racing, other systems work better for touring. Note the new Goldwing now uses a similar dual wishbone setup.

The Bimoto is a hub steered system. This is supposed to be fantastic: light, separation of forces, and responsive. It is expensive though and requires a lot of maintenance.
 

Yellow09

Registered
BMW uses a double wish bone suspension that is much like the suspension on a race car. It separates the turning and braking forces allowing you to turn and brake at the same time and it gets rid of dive. This actually takes getting used to but works extremely well and is the perfect touring arrangement. It also happens to be lighter and, since the front suspension is a shock not a fork, is more durable in theory (BMW front shocks leak, lol).

They don't use this on the sport bikes because forks have the ability to change the bike's geometry to turn better when the bike is braking (the diving). So forks work better for racing, other systems work better for touring. Note the new Goldwing now uses a similar dual wishbone setup.

The Bimoto is a hub steered system. This is supposed to be fantastic: light, separation of forces, and responsive. It is expensive though and requires a lot of maintenance.
My brother's RT has that type of front suspension, it works pretty well and his bike really handles the corners.

I'd imagine Suzuki would be putting the cartridge style on if they made another Busa if for nothing else to save money.
 

fallenarch

THE SLOW RIDER
Registered
My brother's RT has that type of front suspension, it works pretty well and his bike really handles the corners.

I'd imagine Suzuki would be putting the cartridge style on if they made another Busa if for nothing else to save money.
 

Blacksmith

Registered
I just saw these concept renderings yesterday. Both have cool features and looks but idk which I'd like better. I really hos they dont change the looks to much just make it a 400 pound turbo'd 1490 with led's at both ends and a swingarm that doesn't look like I built it in the barn

Screenshot_20190811-225410_Instagram.jpg
 

Sandow

Registered
www.bennetts.co/uk


A New Hayabusa

Of course, with some 10 months to go before Suzuki unveils its full 2020 model range, let alone the 2021 line-up, the firm isn’t spilling the beans on everything to expect – but one machine that’s sure to be part of the 10-new-model plan is the long-awaited Hayabusa replacement.

Our sources now say that the new Busa likely to be a 2021 model, although that doesn’t mean it won’t be revealed this year, just as the ‘2020’ Katana was shown in 2018.

But what technology will it feature?

Our information is that the bike will get an updated, enlarged version of the existing engine, punched out to around 1340cc to make well over 200hp, and that it will be bolted to a completely new frame. And now Suzuki has filed a patent application that might just give us a glimpse of that new chassis.

The patent application, published in Japan towards the end of December 2018, is related to a fairly boring innovation involving the design of an exhaust pipe incorporating catalytic converters into a resonator box under the engine. What’s notable is that the exhaust system is a distinctly Busa-like one, connecting a large four-cylinder engine to a pair of large silencers – one each side of the bike – a classic Hayabusa hallmark.

Given that emissions are the GSX1300R’s biggest stumbling block when it comes to European sales, the new exhaust is a vital addition to the bike, and digging deeper the patent application reveals further clues that it’s showing us the next-generation Hayabusa.

A side-on image shows an unfamiliar aluminium beam frame, but underneath it hangs an engine that shares the same mounting bracket points and general outline as the existing Hayabusa motor. There are changes to the casting of the cylinder head, but that’s to be expected since our information is that the bike’s motor will be a heavily updated version of the existing design. A third drawing shows the underside of the engine, which again matches the layout of the existing Busa motor.

The frame shown in the patent application is much like that of a modern superbike than the existing Hayabusa’s somewhat bulky beam chassis. The rails are slimmer and more sculpted, mirroring the way the GSX-R1000’s chassis has evolved over the years. Behind it sits a new swingarm, with a shape that suggests it’s cast aluminium rather than the extruded and welded alloy of the existing Hayabusa’s equivalent part.

Although there’s no sign of any bodywork, the new chassis clearly includes side-mounted air intake ducts rather than a through-headstock design. Again, that fits what we’re expecting from the next-gen Hayabusa, which is likely to have styling that reflects the design of the Concept GSX styling study that was revealed at the 2015 Tokyo Motor Show.

Although unable to confirm the plans for the new bike, Paul de Lusignan, Suzuki GB general manager, said: “The Hayabusa was a game-changer when it was released 20 years ago, and a real statement of intent from Suzuki to challenge our rivals and beat them. It’s gone on to become a real icon and a symbol of power, speed, and acceleration, and you only have to look at drag strips to see it’s still hugely popular with riders chasing speed with reliability, something we’re very proud of.

“Our engineers are continuing to develop new and exciting models that will be introduced over the next few years. Personally, as someone who has covered thousands of miles on Hayabusas over the years, I am keeping my fingers crossed for a new one, too.”
 

Yellow09

Registered
Unless they make it really light, I can't see an N/A bike being very competitive for long.

I can see why Suzuki would hold this close to their chests as Kawasaki will be very interested to see how powerful they need their platform to be in order to dominate.
 



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