New busa killer


BusaSamurai

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#1
I have been chatting on another board for the VFR and could not believe this guy said this he is the Quote and i answered him .Does he even have a clue on the power difference .



Quote:
Originally Posted by mello dude
I havent riden a 'busa but rode a blackbird a while back. I did a back to back - BB vs VFR. The big power is fun but the extra wheelbase and weight really shows up in twisty stuff. The viffer would walk all over it in the twists. The corners are the most important stuff for me so I'm sticking to the viffer. But damn, another 25-30 horses would be sweet!

My Response below

I am new here so I don't want to seem like a smart Arse but if you was close to me or the dragon I could show you how good the busa does in the twisties..Not sure where you get your info but a 2002 VFR is 7 pounds heavier then a 05Busa..Wheelbase on VFR is 56.7 in . Busa is 58.5 so not that much longer . Lets say you could out turn me while you are dropping gears for power I would torque right by you in one gear..There is no comparison of the power Between the 2 Have rode 2000 VFR for 5 years full exhaust power commander dropped gears and as much as I like the VFR it wouldn't have stood a chance to any stock busa straight away's or twisties..
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BusaSamurai

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#4
It's no Busa Killer...but for just the twisties, I would choose the VFR  
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Why its less power more weight
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Sits different so dont handle as good to me but a great sport touring bike just in a different class. Onlyreason i went to Busa is more power then I found out after wards how much better it handles in the curves . Busa is a beast no doubt but can be leaned just the same.
 

BA BUSA

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#6
7 lbs is no big deal...2 inches of wheel base is huge...and the Busa has TOO much power for the twisties
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BusaSamurai

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#7
I dont have any problems at the gap. Ride with a more experianced rider then me he has a 1998 VFR and he cant keep up in the twisties he says he can turn in faster but just to much torque for him to keep up on the exits .
 
#8
My 2 cents, I and the VFR before they went to the 800 so I'm not sure what year and this is before i got my busa. I don't know how honda does it but most of the bikes I rode from them it was always easy for me to ride them fast with little effort. My busa before susp. work always felt planted but it did require more work to do the twisties. Same riders (skill) I believe the VFR would walk on the busa in the turns, but with a minor susp upgrad let's say $1500 worth (front shocks springs and valves and a new rea shock with height adj) then there is now way the VFR would be close to a busa in the turns.
 

BA BUSA

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#9
My 2 cents, I and the VFR before they went to the 800 so I'm not sure what year and this is before i got my busa.  I don't know how honda does it but most of the bikes I rode from them it was always easy for me to ride them fast with little effort.  My  busa before susp. work always felt planted but it did require more work to do the twisties.  Same riders (skill) I believe the VFR would walk on the busa in the turns, but with a minor susp upgrad let's say $1500 worth (front shocks springs and valves and a new rea shock with height adj) then there is now way the VFR would be close to a busa in the turns.
Greg

I'm just talking stock vs. stock, I think the VFR is easier to get through the twisties.

Also talking "twisties" not sweepers or straights...the tighter and more technical the road gets, the VFR will get further and further ahead.
 

BusaSamurai

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#11
My 2 cents, I and the VFR before they went to the 800 so I'm not sure what year and this is before i got my busa.  I don't know how honda does it but most of the bikes I rode from them it was always easy for me to ride them fast with little effort.  My  busa before susp. work always felt planted but it did require more work to do the twisties.  Same riders (skill) I believe the VFR would walk on the busa in the turns, but with a minor susp upgrad let's say $1500 worth (front shocks springs and valves and a new rea shock with height adj) then there is now way the VFR would be close to a busa in the turns.
Greg

I'm just talking stock vs. stock, I think the VFR is easier to get through the twisties.

Also talking "twisties" not sweepers or straights...the tighter and more technical the road gets, the VFR will get further and further ahead.
In one word Why. 06 to 06 Busa is 478 pounds Dry weight and 58.5 Wheelbase . VFR is 470 Pounds dry and 47.4 WheelBase . 1 inch is gonna make a difference granted but not that much . And we all know at say the dragon the corners are so tight that you are not gonna build that much speed in between and that is where the busa should stay ahead..Alot more grunt low down out of the corners. Im confussed now..
 

BA BUSA

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#12
My 2 cents, I and the VFR before they went to the 800 so I'm not sure what year and this is before i got my busa.  I don't know how honda does it but most of the bikes I rode from them it was always easy for me to ride them fast with little effort.  My  busa before susp. work always felt planted but it did require more work to do the twisties.  Same riders (skill) I believe the VFR would walk on the busa in the turns, but with a minor susp upgrad let's say $1500 worth (front shocks springs and valves and a new rea shock with height adj) then there is now way the VFR would be close to a busa in the turns.
Greg

I'm just talking stock vs. stock, I think the VFR is easier to get through the twisties.

Also talking "twisties" not sweepers or straights...the tighter and more technical the road gets, the VFR will get further and further ahead.
In one word Why.  06 to 06 Busa is 478 pounds Dry weight and 58.5 Wheelbase . VFR is 470 Pounds dry and 47.4 WheelBase . 1 inch is gonna make a difference granted but not that much . And we all know at say the dragon the corners are so tight that you are not gonna build that much speed in between and that is where the busa should stay ahead..Alot more grunt low down out of the corners. Im confussed now..
47.4
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57.4  1.1 shorter wheel base and 8-10 lbs lighter...VFR in my opinion is a easier bike to ride in tight, technical twisties.

It will never out power a Busa on the corner exit...but it will carry more speed into and through the corner.


just my .05 cents man...cause ya can't get anything with .02
 

BusaSamurai

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#13
Guess we will never know . My opinion is my busa still is faster ..Twisties or straight .,Might be wrong but it is my Busa..And i stand by her ...
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#14
Stock tires on the Busa are one of the biggest impediments to direction changes. Not that they are bad tires but Ask anyone who has ditched the stock rubber and set up the suspension (stock adjustments to preload and damping) and you get a vast improvement in roll response! The stock tires while great on the sweepers require a lot of strength to make rapid transitions. I ride with a few guys on R-6’s and while I have never gone balls out and tried to “race emâ€￾ I more than hold my own in the twisties with either of them. And on corner exit fuggedaboutit!
 

Mr. Anderson

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#15
98-01 was the 5th gen. 784CC classified 800. most mags rate this the best overall VFR.
02-06 6th gen, same engine size, VTEC added ,along with more overall weight. ABS was an option.

I just sold my 01 VFR. It was a great all around bike. stock for stock, in the true twisties it will eat a busa up.  unfortunately most of those type of  twisties I would want to ride are not a daily drive for me, or most people.  the type of riding I normaly do, with the HP I was wanting matched me to the busa better. plus the aftermarket for the VFR is a limited one, even as popular as a bike as it is. (right now I don't think there is any aftermarket full exhuast being produced, at least for the 98-01's).

stock, max HP(produced around 9.5-10K rpm) on a VFR is produced by 5-6K rpm on the busa.(around 90-95 rwhp)



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#16
I was on a ride in NW Arkansas with my local Sport Bike club. I'm the only busa in with an R1, 999, 749, VFR, ZX10, GSX750R. These guys are all good riders, dragging pegs and pucks. We rode all the twisties we could find including one road that was about eight, 10 mph hairpins back to back. I was able to push the R1 all the way through the hairpins. And in another stretch of twisties, the 999 duc and I were able to run off and hide from the rest of the bikes.

I don't know if the better the rider, the more the bikes all come together, or if I would say it takes a very good rider to be able to tell the difference. All I know is that my busa will turn with anyone. I do keep fresh Pilot Powers in it, but other than that and the Sirius radio, it's stock.

Just anecdotal experience, and my uneducated opinion
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Paul
 

Jet Li

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#17
I believe pilot ability is the key determining factor in handling the beast we all love. The BUSA is the best "all around" sport bike. I don't believe it was ever intended to out perform the liters, RR's, DUC's, etc.. in twisties. But the BUSA can certainly hold it's own and I have seen plenty of BUSA pilots with max skilz who can not only hold their own, but leave behind other "more maneuverable bikes" in twisties.

I know for me, curve entrance speed is an issue and I still need to adjust my suspension or upgrade.........
 

BusaSamurai

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#20
OK i started it so guess i will try and finish it ,.. Harken ye back to 1983, when ye olde AMA changed it's displacement limits for fours to 750 ccs, and 1000 ccs for twins. There was much rending of hair and gnashing of teeth and the Japanese fabricators brought forth new bikes. There was the GPz750 and the G750E and there was the Interceptor, which was initially introduced just to homolgate the bike for racing. "Hark!" said the motorcyclasti, and "Ho!" said the raceri, who engaged in battle most ferocious. In those dark and mysterious days there was much racing and the Interceptor was the winner. The Interceptor was a radical departure from then current technology, borne from early design exercises which also created the infamous NS bikes. Honda firmly believed in the 90 degree v-four, with its unique power delivery and narrow frontal area. The streets had already seen the V45 Magna, and the track had been dominated by the legendary FWS1000 the year before. The Interceptor hit the streets as a unique repli-racer.
It was the first bike to have a 16 inch front rim, all the rage in racing at the time. Stout 39mm fork tubes rose to a new steel frame which was painted the color of aluminum. The motor was based on the V45 Magna's but the direction of rotation was reversed so that the engine spun in the same direction as the wheels. The gearbox was updated, chain drive fitted, and horsepower was up to 86hp. Short bars, a boldly styled nose fairing mounted on the frame, and a chin dam gave it the extreme looks of a real sportbike. It also had the large fuel petcock mounted into the tank, a feature that owners came to love. It's short 58.6 inch wheelbase, trick front tire, and wide 120/130 series tires made it he best handling 750 of the time. There was that wide powerband that ended up giving it the best quarter mile times, top speed, and lap times of the class. And it was "the "street bike of the time.
The Interceptor kicked major butt on the racetracks that year. It took the AMA championship, and its sister, the RVF took the World Endurance Crown and the Suzuka 8-hour Endurance race. Privateer clubracers found that it was prone to overheating without antifreeze, and the street riders sometimes had problems with the hardfacings on the cams and rocker arms, which was warranteed. But there was universal consensus that the Interceptor was the bike of the year in 1984.


So you see this is why everyone likes it it was derived from a race bike .And it does handle good .Just not good enough for my Busa..Im a Bad Man
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