Almost lost it today!





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#1
Must have been going about 35-40ish and the idiot in front of me had no brake lights! And then on top of that decides to stop in the middle of the road so he can get in the right hand lane!

I was not to close to him a good distance away but when I hit the brakes semi hard the rear locked up! I stomped and stomped on it to break it free and finally it came loose and started rolling again but I slid about 30-40 feet! Scary stuff.

Any reason why this happened? Tire was cold and its worn to hell need a new one asap. Can these things be a factor? Just trying to learn from my experience so I don't do it again.
 
#2
Glad your OK. I did that once myself. Was getting of the interstate ramp and someone pulled a dead stop on me. Almost lost it! Pulling a hard stop with worn out tires is like trying to stop on ice. Get some new tires man. The next time it happens you probably wont be so lucky. :beerchug:
 

Busa1166

Donating Member
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#3
I have used the rear brake hard and it has never locked up on me if it ever did it would be getting disassembled an rebuilt an fresh new fluid. glad you ok:thumbsup:
 
#6
I agree with Revolution, this is a 1300, the engine breaking alone can lock up the rear if you want (back torque trys to stop that but still) use the front breaks 75% beaking power is from the front breaks. think of the weight transfer when breaking. all the weight shifts forward to put force/grip on the front tire, so USE THAT EXTRA GRIP. the rear tire if you are down shifting is already breaking the rear tire and with that breaking force and the fact that weight is lifted off the rear it is easy to lock up the rear with the breaks. Do you come from riding a Harley, cause most of the Harley guys I know they are rear breakers too, I don't try and explain to them though they are all set in their ways, I tried to explain counter steering to them and they totally did not listen... whatever.. so remember break power is on the FRONT (if you are in a high gear low RPMs then engine breaking is not that effective, and you are not running the bike either.. LOL


All said I am glad you didn't lose it man... best of luck and whatch out for them cagers they are a crafty bunch at catching bikes.. LOL
 
#7
locking the rear can cause a high side, be very careful with that, maybe keep it locked if it starts to slid towards the front.
 

NickSully

Donating Member
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#8
I read (never verified) that if your suspension is not setup correctly that could cause the back tire to lock up easier. If the noose dips under hard breaking that causes the back shock to un-compress which will take off the downward force on the rear tire which makes it easier to lock up.

Also, as others have said a worn tire is not helping the situation.
 

macon454

181.552 mph Texas mile on a B-King 3/28/09, AKA "C
Donating Member
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#10
Use your front brake, that is where all your stopping power is at.
That is why they have dual disc on the front and one on the rear.
 
#15
You guys are not going to belive this! I am a front braker. I use both in emergency situations. But I got the new tire next day as told... I HAVE NO REAR BRAKES! F'ing dealer sold me a busa with no brakes! May as well been no pads on there! 0 material on the pads!

Shop that did the tire swap said that was rare for the back to be worn like that and the front to be fine.

I took it back to the dealer I bought it from and I am having the back brakes fixed and the dam front fork seals fixed. Dealer tried to tell me that the brakes where not under warranty I almost killed him but turns out he was busting my nuts lol.
 

Tufbusa

Track Coach / TufPoodle Coach
Registered
#17
You guys are not going to belive this! I am a front braker. I use both in emergency situations. lol.
Using the rear brake in any emergency situation on dry clean pavement is a serious mistake on any sport bike. Cruisers are different. You need both brakes for maximum performance since the front brake does not have enough traction to completely unload the rear.

Proper braking is a learned skill just like cornering, wheelies, stoppies, launching etc. etc. There are few street riders who have taken the time to hone their skills at braking. I find most street guys who come to the track for the first time to be scared to death of the front brake. They are terrified to actually use it. And, it's one of the toughest things to teach someone to do properly. Most can drag their knee long before they learn propr brake control.

I give every student the proper warning, "If you want to go home with your bike and you in one piece, stay off the rear brake"!

The very first race school I ever attended "Stay off the rear brake" was among the first things the instructor told us. However, I knew a lot more than he did and I totally ignored his advise. Low and behold, I hauled a busa home in pieces in the back of a truck, litterally in cardboard boxes. Some of us have to learn the hard way but,,,,,,,,,,,,,, no matter which avenue of learning you choose, you too will learn eventually if you are as mule headed as I was!

:beerchug:
 
#18
not this again...:whistle::whistle:

learn to use both brakes.

be involved in an accident and tell the officer...boy I am glad I didn't use my rear brake or I would have_______________

and they will charge you for basically just running into ______________

track skills are great practice but not always how you should ride on the street.
 

Tufbusa

Track Coach / TufPoodle Coach
Registered
#19
not this again...:whistle::whistle:

learn to use both brakes.

be involved in an accident and tell the officer...boy I am glad I didn't use my rear brake or I would have_______________

and they will charge you for basically just running into ______________

track skills are great practice but not always how you should ride on the street.
Guys with this attitude show up all the time and they often end up on their head. I too was one of them until I learned the hard way. I totalled a brand new busa, only three months old (On the street by the way) and the cause was applying the rear brake at the wrong time.

Your bike doesn't care whether it's on the track or downtown, asphalt is asphalt and braking is braking. If the asphalt is clean and dry, the rear brake is of no use whatsoever. The most important skill you can learn for your own safety is how to use maximum braking effectively. Everyone should practice emergency braking on a regular basis. And if you are wise, you'll leave the rear brake to the skilled professionals who use it as a steering tool.
 
#20
Guys with this attitude show up all the time and they often end up on their head. I too was one of them until I learned the hard way. I totalled a brand new busa, only three months old (On the street by the way) and the cause was applying the rear brake at the wrong time.

Your bike doesn't care whether it's on the track or downtown, asphalt is asphalt and braking is braking. If the asphalt is clean and dry, the rear brake is of no use whatsoever. The most important skill you can learn for your own safety is how to use maximum braking effectively. Everyone should practice emergency braking on a regular basis. And if you are wise, you'll leave the rear brake to the skilled professionals who use it as a steering tool.

basic physics says you are wrong
basic logic says you are wrong

there are 2 contact patches to control, focus all attention to one and you are at its mercy....so when you hit hot tar, gravel or whatever else...you lose ALL of your capacity at once.
 
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