checking chain tension?




hemi

Registered
do u check the amount of slack on the chain or on stands. Checked it tonight on both front and rear stands and it was about 1.25", maybe just a tad more. Does this sound like too much slack or is it just about right. The owners manual says to check it on the sidestand, will that take up a little slack putting it on the kickstand
 

Tufbusa

Track Coach / TufPoodle Coach
Registered
It makes absolutely no difference whether it's on the side stand or on the rear stand.

Easy way to set the chain tension without a measuring devise is to push up on the chain with your index finger about half way between the front and rear sprocket. If you can touch the chain to the swingarm without much effort, the chain is just right. If the chain won't touch the swingarm, it's to tight. If it slaps the swingarm without any effort, it needs adjusting! :beerchug:
 

mike1180

Banned
It makes absolutely no difference whether it's on the side stand or on the rear stand.

Easy way to set the chain tension without a measuring devise is to push up on the chain with your index finger about half way between the front and rear sprocket. If you can touch the chain to the swingarm without much effort, the chain is just right. If the chain won't touch the swingarm, it's to tight. If it slaps the swingarm without any effort, it needs adjusting! :beerchug:
I tried it that way and it is about the 1 inch of slack so that is a good way! :thumbsup:
 

Payne

Registered
It makes absolutely no difference whether it's on the side stand or on the rear stand.

Easy way to set the chain tension without a measuring devise is to push up on the chain with your index finger about half way between the front and rear sprocket. If you can touch the chain to the swingarm without much effort, the chain is just right. If the chain won't touch the swingarm, it's to tight. If it slaps the swingarm without any effort, it needs adjusting! :beerchug:

Wow thanks alot, thats the exact info I needed :)

:thumbsup::thumbsup:
 

dadofthree

Seasoned Beef
Donating Member
Registered
I've always checked the chain tension with me on the bike and the bike up straight. I'll roll it forward a few times as well just in case there's a sweet spot.
 

RedFalco

Donating Member
Registered
It makes absolutely no difference whether it's on the side stand or on the rear stand.

Easy way to set the chain tension without a measuring devise is to push up on the chain with your index finger about half way between the front and rear sprocket. If you can touch the chain to the swingarm without much effort, the chain is just right. If the chain won't touch the swingarm, it's to tight. If it slaps the swingarm without any effort, it needs adjusting! :beerchug:
Wow thanks alot, thats the exact info I needed :)

:thumbsup::thumbsup:
+1 same here ty very much; I was always kinda on the fence as to how tight it should be. This will make it easier in the future, thanks again.

I've always adjusted and checked chain tension when up on both front and rear stands and then afterwards when the bike is on the side stand. Its' the same tension either way.
 

Wag

Evil Demon Busa Rider
Donating Member
Registered
It makes absolutely no difference whether it's on the side stand or on the rear stand.

Easy way to set the chain tension without a measuring devise is to push up on the chain with your index finger about half way between the front and rear sprocket. If you can touch the chain to the swingarm without much effort, the chain is just right. If the chain won't touch the swingarm, it's to tight. If it slaps the swingarm without any effort, it needs adjusting! :beerchug:
I hate to say it but that is not true.

Ideally, the rear wheel needs to be on the ground (no stands) and you need to be sitting on the bike while checking the chain tension.

If you check it while it's on a rear stand, the tension will be too tight because when you set the bike back down, the weight of the bike will stretch on that chain just a touch. It's enough to matter, anyway.

Then, when you sit on it, it stretches it a touch more. Then, every time you hit a bump while riding, it "hits" even more tension on the chain.

Adjusting the chain tension while the bike is in the air is a key reason why chains get beat up before their time.

Again, rear wheel on the ground, you in the seat with your weight on the bike and verify the tension that way.

The only down side to this is that you do have to keep a closer eye on it but you were already doing that anyway, weren't you? :D

--Wag--
 

headrash

Registered
:thumbsup:
I hate to say it but that is not true.

Ideally, the rear wheel needs to be on the ground (no stands) and you need to be sitting on the bike while checking the chain tension.

If you check it while it's on a rear stand, the tension will be too tight because when you set the bike back down, the weight of the bike will stretch on that chain just a touch. It's enough to matter, anyway.

Then, when you sit on it, it stretches it a touch more. Then, every time you hit a bump while riding, it "hits" even more tension on the chain.

Adjusting the chain tension while the bike is in the air is a key reason why chains get beat up before their time.

Again, rear wheel on the ground, you in the seat with your weight on the bike and verify the tension that way.

The only down side to this is that you do have to keep a closer eye on it but you were already doing that anyway, weren't you? :D

--Wag--
 

BusaWizard

On a Steel Horse I ride.
Donating Member
Registered
I hate to say it but that is not true.

Ideally, the rear wheel needs to be on the ground (no stands) and you need to be sitting on the bike while checking the chain tension.

If you check it while it's on a rear stand, the tension will be too tight because when you set the bike back down, the weight of the bike will stretch on that chain just a touch. It's enough to matter, anyway.

Then, when you sit on it, it stretches it a touch more. Then, every time you hit a bump while riding, it "hits" even more tension on the chain.

Adjusting the chain tension while the bike is in the air is a key reason why chains get beat up before their time.

Again, rear wheel on the ground, you in the seat with your weight on the bike and verify the tension that way.

The only down side to this is that you do have to keep a closer eye on it but you were already doing that anyway, weren't you? :D

--Wag--
+100:thumbsup:
 

RedFalco

Donating Member
Registered
I hate to say it but that is not true.

Ideally, the rear wheel needs to be on the ground (no stands) and you need to be sitting on the bike while checking the chain tension.

If you check it while it's on a rear stand, the tension will be too tight because when you set the bike back down, the weight of the bike will stretch on that chain just a touch. It's enough to matter, anyway.

Then, when you sit on it, it stretches it a touch more. Then, every time you hit a bump while riding, it "hits" even more tension on the chain.

Adjusting the chain tension while the bike is in the air is a key reason why chains get beat up before their time.

Again, rear wheel on the ground, you in the seat with your weight on the bike and verify the tension that way.

The only down side to this is that you do have to keep a closer eye on it but you were already doing that anyway, weren't you? :D

--Wag--
(+100 is some serious sheeiate...lol)
Got it - thanks. (self on bike; off stands; check tension)
Hate to eat through this here "like new" ZZZ gold before its time.
Preciate ya!!
 

NickSully

Donating Member
Registered
I hate to say it but that is not true.

Ideally, the rear wheel needs to be on the ground (no stands) and you need to be sitting on the bike while checking the chain tension.

If you check it while it's on a rear stand, the tension will be too tight because when you set the bike back down, the weight of the bike will stretch on that chain just a touch. It's enough to matter, anyway.

Then, when you sit on it, it stretches it a touch more. Then, every time you hit a bump while riding, it "hits" even more tension on the chain.

Adjusting the chain tension while the bike is in the air is a key reason why chains get beat up before their time.

Again, rear wheel on the ground, you in the seat with your weight on the bike and verify the tension that way.

The only down side to this is that you do have to keep a closer eye on it but you were already doing that anyway, weren't you? :D

--Wag--
I have to ask; how does the tension change from being on a swing arm stand to just having the tire on the ground? I understand how it could change with somebody sitting on the bike but I don't see the difference between letting the tire sit on the ground and having the swing arm supported.

I just did my first service and I adjusted the chain with the swing arm stand under the bike. I then read this and went out and checked the tension again when the bike was on the side stand and there was no difference. When I get home tonight I will have to adjust the tension with me sitting on the bike though. I didn't read that in the manual so I checked the tension with no added weight on the bike.
 

flybybusa

Rider formerly known as wingding
Donating Member
Registered
I hate to say it but that is not true.

Ideally, the rear wheel needs to be on the ground (no stands) and you need to be sitting on the bike while checking the chain tension.

If you check it while it's on a rear stand, the tension will be too tight because when you set the bike back down, the weight of the bike will stretch on that chain just a touch. It's enough to matter, anyway.

Then, when you sit on it, it stretches it a touch more. Then, every time you hit a bump while riding, it "hits" even more tension on the chain.

Adjusting the chain tension while the bike is in the air is a key reason why chains get beat up before their time.

Again, rear wheel on the ground, you in the seat with your weight on the bike and verify the tension that way.

The only down side to this is that you do have to keep a closer eye on it but you were already doing that anyway, weren't you? :D

--Wag--
+1 This was my experience. It had a lot of slack when on the rear stand and it was nearly perfect when sitting on the ground.
 

djsin

Lily's Daddy
Registered
I hate to say it but that is not true.

Ideally, the rear wheel needs to be on the ground (no stands) and you need to be sitting on the bike while checking the chain tension.

If you check it while it's on a rear stand, the tension will be too tight because when you set the bike back down, the weight of the bike will stretch on that chain just a touch. It's enough to matter, anyway.

Then, when you sit on it, it stretches it a touch more. Then, every time you hit a bump while riding, it "hits" even more tension on the chain.

Adjusting the chain tension while the bike is in the air is a key reason why chains get beat up before their time.

Again, rear wheel on the ground, you in the seat with your weight on the bike and verify the tension that way.

The only down side to this is that you do have to keep a closer eye on it but you were already doing that anyway, weren't you? :D

--Wag--
I agree with this methode
 

djsin

Lily's Daddy
Registered
It makes absolutely no difference whether it's on the side stand or on the rear stand.

Easy way to set the chain tension without a measuring devise is to push up on the chain with your index finger about half way between the front and rear sprocket. If you can touch the chain to the swingarm without much effort, the chain is just right. If the chain won't touch the swingarm, it's to tight. If it slaps the swingarm without any effort, it needs adjusting! :beerchug:
this would only be true if the swing arm pivoted from the same point as the front sprocket center line, last time I checked its 6 inches behind and up
 

Acehole

The crowbar!
Donating Member
Registered
How do you guys sit on the bike AND check the chain tension at the same time? I'm not a contortionist. mirrors maybe????

If you put the bike on a rear stand and then the stand on a scale, will it weigh less than putting the rear tire on only?

so many questions...
 

Big D

Registered
I use both the front AND rear stand so the bike is fully supporting it's own weight, evenly across both axles. I have to be honest, checking it this way and checking it on the side stand have yielded the same measurements for me. I have yet to check the tension while sitting on the bike, since I seldom have "help" around.

D
 



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