Voltage Regulator problem - too high voltage




Berlin Germany

Registered
yes - again and again some of my hayabusa colleagues haye problems with a charging voltage of around 14.8 volts or higher especially at gen I´s.

everyone knows that such a high voltage is lethal for any acid-filled batteries after only a short period of time because the liquid evaporates and the lead plates first dry and then, if not been refilled with destilled water, get a internal plate circuit.
end of battery´s life
but one hayabusa driver here in berlin found a seemingly nice and easy solution by using the "active" regulator/rectifier of a Honda CB 1100 XX (type sc35) from ´99-´02 plus a separate additional 30A relay.
how that works and which spare parts you´ll need overall the following picture should show you.
that way he got at maximum 14.2 volt charging.
to be able to control then that voltage also during driving, he also used a digital display for voltage near the cockpit (at handlebars) .
this solution is now i think older than 3 or 4 years and works still perfect. :thumbsup:

2019-11-24 wiring diagram Dubble-X Regulator at Haya Gen.jpg

to download the *.jpg above as a pdf klick here.


little add:
a LiFePo4 can stand more than these 14.9 volt - the sellers say up to 15.5 volt no problem visable
i bought one for my yamaha fj 1200 in march 2017 and the LiFePo has only 4.5 Ah instead of 10 or 12 Ah of the acid-filled original.
but this really doesn´t matter - the LiFePo4 has a coldstarting voltage of about 240 A what makes every starting motor begging for less voltage - i seriously promise.
the only little prob the LiFePo´s have at temperatures under around 15-18°C / 59-64°F (e.g. over night) is that then they need some 1.5 - 2 minutes with ignition on and switched on lights to "remember" (I personally call this an internal warm-up ;) ) that they have to work properly after this max. 2 minutes,
what they realy do then !
promised seriously - works anytime - even now at only 5-6 °C / 41-42 °F (standing in the yard overnight) till today. :thumbsup:
 

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Berlin Germany

Registered
So who are you advertising for?
good question

and i don´t know

both solutions are great and long lasting.

the lifepo only is worse when you only look for kapacity
the original haya acid´s have arrond 10-12 Ah - the lifepo which fits into haya´s place, i use, 4.5 Ah
so if you want to light / illuminate something a longer time the acid would be better 10/12 against 4.5

other example
motor and lights off / only hazard lights on = 4 x 21 W = 84W / 12V = 7 A
the one year old acid (~7-8 Ah) can stand this for ~ 1 hour (70% capacity left)
my lifepo with 4.5Ah / 7A ~ a bit more than half an hour (~0.6h)

but
the acids loose in the first year up to 30 % of their cap. and they can´t stand more than arround 14.5 v by a long charging time
the lifepo shrugs his shoulders and stays fit

let me say it this way:
an electrician uses the regulator solution
the mechanic (like me) takes the lifepo

it´s up to you. what are you elec or mech? ;)
 

Boosted Cycle Perf

Donating Member
Site Sponsor
Registered
good question

and i don´t know

both solutions are great and long lasting.

the lifepo only is worse when you only look for kapacity
the original haya acid´s have arrond 10-12 Ah - the lifepo which fits into haya´s place, i use, 4.5 Ah
so if you want to light / illuminate something a longer time the acid would be better 10/12 against 4.5

other example
motor and lights off / only hazard lights on = 4 x 21 W = 84W / 12V = 7 A
the one year old acid (~7-8 Ah) can stand this for ~ 1 hour (70% capacity left)
my lifepo with 4.5Ah / 7A ~ a bit more than half an hour (~0.6h)

but
the acids loose in the first year up to 30 % of their cap. and they can´t stand more than arround 14.5 v by a long charging time
the lifepo shrugs his shoulders and stays fit

let me say it this way:
an electrician uses the regulator solution
the mechanic (like me) takes the lifepo

it´s up to you. what are you elec or mech? ;)
Electrical engineer, AND a mechanic here.
 

Boosted Cycle Perf

Donating Member
Site Sponsor
Registered
lol - hard decision ;)
Not really. I’ll play both right now.

The experienced shop owning mechanic side of me knows that even with a mosfet rectifier and high output stator you’ll never see over 14 volts on a Hayabusa.

My engineering side knows that it’s not voltage that Kills cells in batteries, it’s amp draw. On a lead acid when amperage draw is at a higher rate then the battery can discharge is what kills cells from of heat.

Lastly, Ohms Law dictates that when current goes down, voltage goes up, and visa versa. So if these mythical 14.8 volt charging system Hayabusas actually existed, that would mean very little load (current) was being applied to the charging system, and ohms law is still law allowing voltage to go up.
 



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