How do you build your own 24 v start Harness




mwgw

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#1
I going to build a switch like:
"Tiger Racing 24 Volt Starter Kit Suzuki GSX1300R Hayabusa" - but cheaper.
Question: how many amps switch must withstand. There will apparently be a DPDT switch with three positions. Where are they to buy and what do they cost.
Grateful for answers own
 

icemansid

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#3
Using 30 amp relay and 8g wire - works flawlessly. Much smaller wire can be used when you are using the higher voltage.
 

mwgw

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#4
If we take it from basic, if you use a DPDT relay exactly how do you connect the 6-8 pins on the relay: COM 1 to NO or NC & COM 2 til NO or NC to the bike's electrical system?
The supply voltage that opens and closes the relay were did you you take it from. It should be taken from the voltage generated when you turn the ignition switch to ON and system troubleshooting himself before starting voltage reaches the start button.
Where did your take the voltage. The ignition switch or somewhere else?

Curious

DPDTRELAY_0.jpg
 

icemansid

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#5
On the road so I will be short. Will explain more tonight when I get to the motel. The I took the cable from the starter relay to te starter out and used that as the activation for the system. Look at my pics in my thread.
 

icemansid

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#6
So making some assumptions on your image but Coil 1 comes from the factory starter relay output (originally going to the starter), Coil 8 - ground.

Com1 - battery 2 negative, NC1 ground, NO1 - 12V constant from battery 1
Com2 - Battery 2 positive, NC2 12V constant from battery 1, NO2 - Starter

Does that make any sense? You could tag NO1 and NC2 together as well. It would save 1 wire in the mix.
 

GIXERHP

ok, ok...just a wee bit Irish...
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#7
Just an FYI here this has been done before, and as long as you have a STOCK MOTOR this will work for a while.
If you want the longevity, you need to source 70 amp relays.
When i did this with a 1397 it lasted a month, and then the bike was stranded.
 

icemansid

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#9
Ok so here is a though - Watts = Amps * Volts or Amps = Watts/Volts
So assuming the starter is fused @ 30 amps, 30 amps is the most the starter can pull. (verification needed, but i am very certain that is a 30 amp fuse)

30 * 12 = 360

So if we change the voltage to 24

360/24 = 15

so doesn't that show us that by increasing the voltage, assuming the watts used does not change, we are actually decreasing the amperage being pulled by the relay?
 

mwgw

Registered
#10
In itself, the starting current which passes the relay from the starter relay and to the starter motor at approx. 80-100 amps.
But on the other hand can withstand the starter relay 30 amp fuse incredible deal before it burns up. Tried to start the bike with jumper cables from a car when the bike did not start, we gassed on the car engine to produce more starting current but then burned the fuse.
On one hand, the original bike secured at 30 amps but on the change side is the starter relay is not just an ordinary relay but also has a itegrerad soleoid whose function is precisely to deal with strong currents.
As possible. requires a stronger relay or even a second starter relay with soleoid.
 

icemansid

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#12
High compression motors are harder to start. if you get kick-back, it could cause damage to the case. 24V starting spins the starter twice as fast with more torque. Easier starting.
 

eDs

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#13
High compression motors are harder to start. if you get kick-back, it could cause damage to the case. 24V starting spins the starter twice as fast with more torque. Easier starting.
Ok cool. So you guys are sending 24V through the 12V starter and it doubles up in speed?
 

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