Help!





#1
I have a 07 Busa with about 5,200 miles on it, I have a couple of questions and sorry if im supposed to make different threads for it. 1. Does it hurt to shift your bike without the clutch on upshifts? any damage to the clutch? 2. Approx. how many miles do you get out of a set of pads and rotors? I know everybodys different but just a guesstimation, and do you replace rotors every time? 3. Finally, how about the sprockets and chain, About what mileage should I start to look out to replace those? No wheelies or burnouts, sometimes WOT and normal top speed runs. Thanks in advance for your responses. :bowdown:
 

BUBBA

Foghoon Leghoon
Donating Member
Registered
#2
I hope clutch-less shifting doesn't hurt anything as I have been doing it for years on all my bikes with no worries so far.
As for the other items I have not had the Busa long enough to know.
The experts will arrive shortly to answer all questions.
Bubba
 

TonyMastodon

Big Blue Burrito!
Registered
#3
i wonder the same thing :p..ive done it a few times and just doesnt sound pretty :p...

im not racing so ill take the time and pull the clutch and then rev match =)
 

BUBBA

Foghoon Leghoon
Donating Member
Registered
#4
i wonder the same thing :p..ive done it a few times and just doesnt sound pretty :p...

im not racing so ill take the time and pull the clutch and then rev match =)
The trick is to put a fair amount of pressure on the shifter and when you reach your RPM blip the throttle and it just clicks in. When it's done right it is silent, fast and feels much better than up shifting with the clutch.
Just my 2cts.
Bubba
 

Jay Willie

Donating Member
Registered
#5
hey, Ram! :welcome: to the .oRg!! Good initial questions, you'll probably get a lot of varied answers as some of the responses depend on type of use and circumstances.

Chain/sprocket question is a monitored maintenance issue judged by a visual inspection of the sprockets and a physical measurement of the chain.

Shifting any manual transmission without the clutch is circumstantial but as far as the bike is concerned, under normal riding conditions use the clutch. A lot of people who compete in whatever form will shift clutchless but be forewarned this is hard on the transmission. So it depends on what you are willing to endure in maintenance and parts/replacement investments.

Pads and rotors are another monitored maintenance issue and life expectancy depends on your riding habits, ie: mainly front brake use, 'riding' the brake, mainly rear brake use (a no-no among more experienced riders!). If you are on top of your game, you'll eyeball your pads to determine rate of wear and replace before you allow metal to metal contact from a set of worn out pads. If you don't overheat your rotors through excessive/competition braking and keep the pads changed out with a good quality set before they wear out, you should see a long life from your rotors, again monitored through checking rotor thickness with a set of calipers.

My advice would be to invest in a good service manual for your bike. Should be available at your local parts house (NAPA, O'reilly's, Autozone, etc.). You may not use all the information available but this will help you become more familiar with what goes along with motorcycle ownership...it's just a little more than 'hop on baby, let's go!'

Good luck to you and again :welcome:
 

TonyMastodon

Big Blue Burrito!
Registered
#7
The trick is to put a fair amount of pressure on the shifter and when you reach your RPM blip the throttle and it just clicks in. When it's done right it is silent, fast and feels much better than up shifting with the clutch.
Just my 2cts.
Bubba
ill have to try that! thanks
 

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