110 volt wire feed welders?



bigoltool

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Anybody got any experience with the new generation of 110v wire feed welders? I am trying to get a set of Maximum Motorsports subframe connectors welded into my Mustang and so far the shops want more than I can buy a welder for to do the seemingly simple job. So I started looking at some of the flux core/ Mig welders from Lincoln, Hobart and Clarke. A lot of really positive reviews from what I have read. Its been a long time since I Mig welded ( or any welded for that matter:laugh:). Here are a few I have been looking at. I am hoping to do this job with flux core wire due to the extra cost of an Argon Bottle.

Lincoln 2185

Clarke 130EN

Hobart Handler 125
 

F=MA

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No recent experience, but fifteen years or so ago I had a 110V Lincoln that I used in my shop. It worked great for auto body repair work. Can't remember the model number. I think I paid about $600 for it.

That was a whole other lifetime ago.
 

twotonevert

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The Hobart you have listed is the one I have. It will do anything you want to do around the house. I built a trailer with it and welded 1/2" plate. I know it says 3/16, but it will do 1/2 if you take your time. I love this little welder. Buy shielded wire and you will be set.
 

Mr Bogus

Trouble Makers Inc.
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although they are rated for 1/8" material, I would think that this might not be enough welder for sub-frame connectors unless you have a lot of surface area to work with..

I used to do a lot of work like that in my shop (mostly used my Miller 150)
I would call around a few auto shops or even an exhaust shop (most have wirefeeds now)
 

turbobusa2000

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I own a similar model Lincoln that you listed. It worked well for some applications. Using flux cored wire is ok. I did the gas conversion on my welder. Well worth the money. Being that your trying to save some money you should be alright. I wouldn't expect clean welds with the flux cored stuff, lots of spatter and just harder to work a puddle.
 

jwcfbd

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I own a similar model Lincoln that you listed. It worked well for some applications. Using flux cored wire is ok. I did the gas conversion on my welder. Well worth the money. Being that your trying to save some money you should be alright. I wouldn't expect clean welds with the flux cored stuff, lots of spatter and just harder to work a puddle.
Same thing here. I would go with the gas kit over the flux core stuff if you can. :beerchug:
 

Butter Bean

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I have the Clarke and have not had any trouble with it. It would probably work much better if I knew how to weld. I've welded on both alum and steel and... well lets just say i can make stuff stick together. but I wouldn't stand under it. but thats me not the machine. no issues with the machine though.
 

Pardini

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I have the Hobart and it's a great unit. I've never used flux core wire though. I run mine with a 5 pound co2 bottle. No complaints, but like Bogus said, might not be up to that particular job.
 

bigoltool

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Thanks for the replies. The material being welded is .082 wall 1.5"x2" rectangular tubing. The sub-frames themselves are just stamped sheet metal welded to the floor pan. Not sure of the actual thickness but I think it is somewhat thinner than the Connectors. The two quotes I have received so far have been over $300, an RV welding shop declined the job and most of the others I emailed wouldn't even return em. If I do it in my Garage I can get the car up on Stands and take my time and get everything the way I want it! The book I have (about 16 years old) said to use ER70S-6 .030 solid wire which needs to be used with Argon. Anyone know if there is a modern day flux cored equivalent of that wire? The most prevalent flux core wire I have seen is the NR-211-MP stuff.

All this is leading up to my suspension overhaul. I need new shocks and bushings and before I do that I have read that the connectors are the single best thing you can do for your car.
 

Mr Bogus

Trouble Makers Inc.
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I do not like flux wire.. I usually use an argon/co2 mixed gas as well (cheaper to boot) Seems like the material is well under the .125 capacity of the welders so hey go for it... Hobart and Lincoln are both good names.. never used the other...

A word of caution.. when ever welding to floor pans.. ALWAYs (and no exceptions) pull the carpet up off the floor.. I have seen more than one car burned on the rack when welding work on sections of the floor pan went wrong.. the half hour in work is far better than the stress of watching a car burn to the ground..

May sound like overkill and I am sure there are some that will go "I do it all the time" but this is not the time or place to figure out that they may have been lucky or knew what they were doing.. :) I have done hundreds of weld jobs on chassis and never had a problem... but I still subscribe to better to charge you the extra hour to pull the rug than try to explain to you and my insurance company why the car caught fire... :)
 

bigoltool

Registered
I thought the same thing too and will take precautions for certain. You aren't actually welding on the floor pan. The Subrames actually protrude down about 1.5 to 2" below the actual floorpan. Heres a representation of the job.


I do not like flux wire.. I usually use an argon/co2 mixed gas as well (cheaper to boot) Seems like the material is well under the .125 capacity of the welders so hey go for it... Hobart and Lincoln are both good names.. never used the other...

A word of caution.. when ever welding to floor pans.. ALWAYs (and no exceptions) pull the carpet up off the floor.. I have seen more than one car burned on the rack when welding work on sections of the floor pan went wrong.. the half hour in work is far better than the stress of watching a car burn to the ground..

May sound like overkill and I am sure there are some that will go "I do it all the time" but this is not the time or place to figure out that they may have been lucky or knew what they were doing.. :) I have done hundreds of weld jobs on chassis and never had a problem... but I still subscribe to better to charge you the extra hour to pull the rug than try to explain to you and my insurance company why the car caught fire... :)
IMG_0888.jpg
 

bigoltool

Registered
They sell some that are not full length like these but from what I read these are the best way to go as a foundation to all other suspension mods. I am Planning on going with either Bilsteins or Koni Yellows and some Mild lowering springs to tighten things up a bit. Probably replace all the Bushings in the trailing arms with Urethane as well.
 


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