Google Exec. Resets sky diving height record!




RedBusarider

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Must be nice to be SO rich that you can do just about what ever you want to.

Next up is to become invisible or become :superman:
 

skydivr

Jumps from perfectly good Airplanes
Donating Member
Highest I've ever been is 21K with Oxygen. And it was COLD and THIN even there. There is NOTHING to fly with at that Altitude I can't even imagine...
 

FlatlandBusa

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Highest I've ever been is 21K with Oxygen. And it was COLD and THIN even there. There is NOTHING to fly with at that Altitude I can't even imagine...
The atmospheric pressure at 136,000 ft is only .01933 psi !!! By comparison the tallest paved road in the U.S. @ 14,200 feet has 8.817 psi, 136,000 feet is 456 times less! 21,000 feet has 6.787 psi, 136,000 feet is roughly 350 times less!!! (if I googled accurately)
 

dadofthree

Seasoned Beef
Donating Member
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He was traveling initially at 800 M.P.H. and created a sonic boom. Great feat and he did it on the cheap. Can't say much about jumping from a weather balloon, at least it wasn't a perfectly good plane :laugh:
 

FlatlandBusa

Registered
He was traveling initially at 800 M.P.H. and created a sonic boom. Great feat and he did it on the cheap. Can't say much about jumping from a weather balloon, at least it wasn't a perfectly good plane :laugh:
I can't believe the human body can stand the transition to super sonic and back. I remember reading that some planes have issues dealing the the stresses.
 

skydivr

Jumps from perfectly good Airplanes
Donating Member
I can't believe the human body can stand the transition to super sonic and back. I remember reading that some planes have issues dealing the the stresses.
I believe it's got something to do with the mass of the object, and how high and thin the air is to reach that speed.
 

ZRXMAX

Registered
Pretty amazing jump in my opinion. I like the fact that he pushed the envelope and survived.

I searched highest flying plane... wow! I had no idea a Mig 25 reached over 120,000 ft back in 1977.

Piston-driven propeller aeroplane[edit]
The highest altitude obtained by a piston-driven propeller UAV (without payload) is 67,028 feet (20,430 m). It was obtained during 1988–1989 by the Boeing Condor UAV.[40]

The highest altitude obtained in a piston-driven propeller biplane (without a payload) was 17,083 m (56,047 ft) on October 22, 1938 by Mario Pezzi at Montecelio, Italy in a Caproni Ca.161 driven by a Piaggio XI R.C. engine.[41]

The highest altitude obtained in a piston-driven propeller monoplane (without a payload) was 18,552 m (60,866 ft) on August 4, 1995 by the Grob Strato 2C driven by two Teledyne Continental TSIO-550 engines.

Jet aircraft[edit]
The highest current world absolute general aviation altitude record -General Aviation World Records- achieved by a manned air-breathing jet propelled aircraft is 37,650 metres (123,520 ft) set by Alexandr Fedotov, in a Mikoyan Gurevitch E-266M (MiG-25M), on 31 August 1977.

Rocket plane[edit]
The highest altitude obtained by a manned aeroplane (launched from another aircraft) is 111,996 m (367,441 ft) by Brian Binnie in the Scaled Composites SpaceShipOne (powered by a Scaled Composite SD-010 engine with 18,000 pounds (8,200 kg) of thrust) on 4 October 2004 at Mojave, CA. The previous (unofficial) record was 107,960 m (354,199 ft) set by Joseph A. Walker in an North American X-15 in mission X-15 Flight 91 on August 22, 1963. Walker had reached 106 km - crossing the Kármán line the first time - with X-15 Flight 90 the previous month.

The highest altitude obtained by a rocket-propelled aeroplane (self-launched—i.e. not launched from another aircraft) was 24,217 m (79,452 ft) on May 2, 1958 by Roger Carpentier over Istres, France in a Sud-Ouest Trident II mixed power (turbojet and rocket) aircraft.[42]

Electrically powered aircraft[edit]
The highest altitude obtained by an electrically powered aircraft is 96,863 feet (29,524 m) on August 14, 2001 by the NASA Helios, and is the highest altitude in horizontal flight by a winged aircraft. This is also the altitude record for propeller driven aircraft, FAI class U (Experimental / New Technologies), and FAI class U-1.d (Remotely controlled UAV : Weight 500 kg to less than 2'500 kg).[43]

Rotorcraft
 

fallenarch

THE SLOW RIDER
Registered
I believe it's got something to do with the mass of the object, and how high and thin the air is to reach that speed.
That's truly amazing. I imagine the most dangerous part of the flight is the time it takes for the balloon to get high enough for the chute to open if he needed to abort. I wonder how he controlled spin and how he decelerated from super sonic to slow enough to open the chute? I have been told y a NASA buddy that there is very little different force wise as you push through the speed of sound. The boom happens behind the object and is barely noticeable if you are the one who created it.

I wonder at what altitude do you start to really feel less gravity?
 

skydivr

Jumps from perfectly good Airplanes
Donating Member
That's truly amazing. I imagine the most dangerous part of the flight is the time it takes for the balloon to get high enough for the chute to open if he needed to abort. I wonder how he controlled spin and how he decelerated from super sonic to slow enough to open the chute? I have been told y a NASA buddy that there is very little different force wise as you push through the speed of sound. The boom happens behind the object and is barely noticeable if you are the one who created it.

I wonder at what altitude do you start to really feel less gravity?
When we are skydiving, for us the hard deck is 1000ft. Below that we are usually gonna stay with the airplane, and above it we are gonna jump. Gotta tell you though, if I'm at the back door and it's 800 ft I'm going out the door if the plane is on fire or the engine quits, and I'm not waiting for permission. My reserve will open. As the air content increased, it AUTOMATICALLY takes the jumper back under supersonic, I'd bet over 80,000 ft...
 

fallenarch

THE SLOW RIDER
Registered
So if it slows the jumper from 600 mph or so (not sure what the speed of sound is up that high) then wouldn't there be a lot of heat created from the friction? Man the more I think about this the more fascinating it gets!
 



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