Compressed Air Garage Lines.

ks-waterbug

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Well as many of you know I recently purchased a Ingersoll-rand verticle compressor for my garage. I wanted to also add outlets for the compressor at various locations throughout the three bays. So, without further ado who can tell me about this company? <span style='color:red'>GARAGE-PAK</span> I'm looking to plumb in the whole system for that professional look/feel.... Anyone, have any experience with this or any other company?
 

thepushercg

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that looks like a nice setup. at the bodyshop we just ran the air line along the wall and put outlets ever 10 foot or so. i think you could do this and make it look good a whole lot cheaper than the garage pack set up.
 

MoosesBusa

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I installed around 300' of that piping at a car wash in Jacksonville Fl. Was the slickest and easiest install I have ever done. Also the fastest. The downside was it was also the most expensive. Use a tubing cutter when sutting the powder coated aluminum pipe instead of a saw. Works much better and you don't have the burr problem.
You can do the same thing with PVC for 1/4 the cost and it will would look just as good. With PVC just be sure to support the pipe every 4 feet to eliminate sag over the years. 1/2" Sch 40 PVC will withstand 400+ psi easily.
 

Professor

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The only thing I see wrong with it is the lack of a water trap on the outlets. It can really be a problem in the humid areas we live in. Metal is better than plastic, but a pain to work with.

You need to make a slope toward the end. Each tap in the main line should loop up and back down. You should be taking the air from a point higher than the end of the drop. The bottom of the drop should have a drain valve.

That is the way I set up my shop years ago using black iron. However, I never did anything that nice at my house.
 

ks-waterbug

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Yes, I'd thought about using PVC but wanted something that would look good as well as perform. Hated to spend the extra $$ but considering I won't be changing this for years thought I'd spend up front.... Good to hear someone has used this system before and liked what they saw that makes me feel a whole lot better. Now I'm really excited about using this system! Rick, I'm having just what you mentioned added to the system along with some other extra's that I hope add to not only the appearance but the performance of the system. Keep those comments coming, I'm sure I've forgotten something or there is another system someone is using.....
beerchug.gif
 

Wag

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My father in law did it with PVC years ago. I'm thinking that as long as you use Spec 400, you'll do just fine with it.

--Wag--
 

bigoltool

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There was a dream garage article in Popular mechanics years ago that stuck with me. They plummed the whole shop with PVC and as a few other mentioned ran the drops so they looped back up to the fitting with a drain at the bottom of each drop. That stuff is cool but man hard to argue with PVC.
 

Rhythm

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Nice deal there, Sonny I'm in the same boat. I just recently installed a deep sink with hot, cold water with a drainline back into the house system along and relocating my air compressor down to the crawspace (basement). The relocation will give me more floor space in the garage and help remove the air moisture after I install a de-humidifer in the basement.

Most of my air line (PVC) plumbing will be down in the crawlspace with a single tap entering the garage with an air water separator using retractable air/water lines to get me around the garage.  One for the sink and the other for the airline separator connection. The sink (home Depot) has a hose fitting making it easy connecting and disconnecting the retractable water hose when I need it.

Heres where I will be getting my retractable air/water hose reel.

Heres my deepsink sitting ontop of a 5" concrete slab I poured to keep off the wet floor.
DSC03392.jpg


And a photo of the hose reels I will be using.

46104-t.gif
 

06BUSA

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Just go to Home Depot or similar. Go copper and sweat fit it. Got a plummer buddy?
 

Rhythm

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(06BUSA @ Nov. 11 2006,13:16) Just go to Home Depot or similar. Go copper and sweat fit it. Got a plummer buddy?
Why, when PVC is cheaper, less hassle to work with and will do the job if you can reduce moisture easily ?

I got mo time than money.
 

ranman

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the pvc and copper are not to good of an idea. yes both have a rated burst pressure above 100psi but the design operating presure is much lower.
becareful
 

Rhythm

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(ranman @ Nov. 11 2006,14:34) the pvc and copper are not to good of an idea. yes both have a rated burst pressure above 100psi but the design operating presure is much lower.
becareful
Good lQQkn out Ran. I was a little concerned myself until I read a few of the above post regarding PVC usages.

Wag
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Posted on: Nov. 09 2006,08:24

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
My father in law did it with PVC years ago. I'm thinking that as long as you use Spec 400, you'll do just fine with it.

--Wag-- [/Quote]

I will be using just a little of 30' length with two 90 degree bends with a psi less than 200 psi.
 

06BUSA

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Copper has a rating higher then 100 by far. PVC also has a high pressure service type. But for peace of mind. I was talking about the ridged copper that plummers use, red or blue I dont remember. But lets say your ladder falls or slips from your hands, would you rather have it strike PVC or a ridged metal pipe?
Note, he also said he wanted it to look good. Cooper is pretty and actually easy to work with. Sweat fittings are like welds, HVAC people use them when connecting your AC compressor.
And if those PVC compression fits are anything like copper tubing compression fittings they will not fail before the PVC its self.
 

Rhythm

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(06BUSA @ Nov. 11 2006,15:43) Copper has a rating higher then 100 by far. PVC also has a high pressure service type. But for peace of mind. I was talking about the ridged copper that plummers use, red or blue I dont remember. But lets say your ladder falls or slips from your hands, would you rather have it strike PVC or a ridged metal pipe?
Note, he also said he wanted it to look good. Cooper is pretty and actually easy to work with. Sweat fittings are like welds, HVAC people use them when connecting your AC compressor.  
And if those PVC compression fits are anything like copper tubing compression fittings they will not fail before the PVC its self.
No agruement from me.
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