Women And Hayabusas

Discussion in 'New Owners Forum' started by Amanda Anderson, Nov 8, 2016.


  1. Amanda Anderson

    Amanda Anderson Registered

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    • I am a female wanting to get a Hayabusa. I have been told it's impossible for a women of my size 5'4 120 pounds to ride a Hayabusa. Need some other intakes besides my family thanks.
     
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  2. nosbig

    nosbig Registered

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    First off, gender has nothing to do with it. For a person your size it will come down more to experience. The busa is a top heavy bike. If you are comfortable handling a motorcycle you will be fine. If you have never sat on a motorcycle it will be way more of a struggle for you.
     
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  3. Amanda Anderson

    Amanda Anderson Registered

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    I don't have much experience with sportbikes. Have been riding dirt bikes since I was 5. I know they are way different. Should I start with another bike. I really have just fallen in love with hayabusas.
     
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  4. majestic12

    majestic12 Hunting Kawasakis Donating Member Registered

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    Nos big is right gender has nothing to do with it.

    Physical sizes does. I have a 31 inch inseam and I can sit flat footed but, just barely . there have been a few times a little bit of gravel can mess with the little bit of footing I have.

    Keep in mind I have not modified the seat hight. some of our shorter riders will be along to help.

    If you get one enjoy the ride.
     
  5. nosbig

    nosbig Registered

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    Your dirt bike experience will help . Best thing you could do is go sit on one and see how it feels to you. That will give you an idea of weather or not you think you can handle the weight and height. Although height can be adjusted a bit.
     
  6. TheJwexperience

    TheJwexperience Registered

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    I think you're good since you know how to ride, sounds like you've got the hard stuff figured out. Just take it easy and look out for cagers. look into getting it lowered too so you can touch unless you've got long legs:welcome:
     
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  7. captain

    captain Dis in my way! Staff Member Administrator

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    Send a message to Vabusa, she has ridden all over the country on her busa and would be a great person to talk to in regards to this.

    cap
     
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  8. MC MUSTANG

    MC MUSTANG Peace Keeper or Ban Hammer-it's up to you; IDMBT#9 Staff Member Administrator Registered

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    ^^^ This- and welcome!
     
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  9. twotonevert

    twotonevert Member of P.E.A. Moderator Donating Member Registered

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    Welcome to the org. We have many lady busa riders.
     
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  10. CBXRider

    CBXRider Donating Member Registered

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    Think of the horsepower your dirt bikes had, 30-50 maybe? Then think of having 150-180+ hp at the wheel on a Busa. My daughter rides but on a very light and nimble SV650. Great brakes, handles great and hauls azz as well. Maybe try a few miles on a forty incher before trying on an eighty incher.
     
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  11. Mike Chambers

    Mike Chambers Registered

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    Hi . I don't see an issue with the height or size factor , I have a Philippine mate here who rides a busa , he got it lowered a little but finds it easy , anyway welcome to the family .
     
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  12. Mike Chambers

    Mike Chambers Registered

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    Maybe get a bit of roadbike experience first might be a good idea, talk with other riders local to you to get feedback ,as my dad says it's like going from a Morris minor (pommie car 1960s )to a mustang v8.
     
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  13. dave s

    dave s Registered

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    If you have a lot of dirt bike experience ,controlling slides etc you will be fine,more skilled then most and remember it only goes as fast as you want it to
     
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  14. c10

    c10 Registered

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    This is my wife @ 5' 5" with a 27" inseam ( I measured since were bike shopping for her ) The work boots worn are steel toe metatarsal that add 1.5" to her length ( 28.5 " now ) The Bird pictured is a Gen 2 not lowered at all with a 190/55 rear tire that raises the bike just a bit . She is also 126 pounds . She could do it , but is choosing a lighter machine . I'm 5' 1 " with a 29" inseam ( 29.5 " with my riding boots ) . I'm not a fan of lowered bike as it reduces ground clearance , and changes drasticly how a bike was meant to handle . Here are some reference pictures taken last
    weekend . My birds seat height is 31.5 " .

    20161106_075036_zpsaca0igi4.jpg
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    20161106_165023_zpso3zy2izx.jpg

    Her current bike has a 31 .5 seat height , and the seat is a whopping 16 " across were the birds seat is 14 " were we both sit at . Seat width has a big part in bike choices .

    20161022_103911_HDR_zps50mkaaje.jpg
     
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  15. VaBusa

    VaBusa oRg Gal Staff Member Administrator Registered

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    Welcome to the oRg!! Love female riders joining, and when they like the Busa, even better :)

    I've had mine for 13 years now, graduated from the smallest Harley on the market with only 2000 miles or so behind me. I'm 5'6", 135 lbs, and I did have to have my Busa lowered. I've also had the seat cut down, which is really overkill (did that for looks), but in retrospect, I might have been able to just cut the seat to get flat-footed. I have a friend (another gal) that used to ride a Busa and drag race, and she's 5'4". She never lowered her bike at all; she was all legs, unlike me, so I'm finding there isn't a formula depending on height or weight because we're all so different. Just make sure you can flat foot any bike and that you're comfortable pushing it around a parking lot, backing it up, etc.

    The Busa is a heavy bike and if you can, sit on other bikes you like just to get an idea of the weight differences. Riding is one thing, but when you've got to move them around or you're riding slower for long periods of time, you begin to feel just how heavy a bike the Busa is...like you said though, I just loved 'em, so I bought one, having never ridden a sport bike in my life. In fact, I'd never ridden any other bike (except my Harley) until just a couple of months ago. That's when I realized just how heavy my Busa really is LOL

    And the gratuitous low-res shot from my recent trip to the Dragon...I spent most of that trip riding on Honda Groms, so the Busa felt extra heavy on this run!

    20161109_082909.png
     
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  16. VIPER

    VIPER Formerly known as viperblackbusa. Registered

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    Welcome. Busa has been discussed as a first bike multiple times. You will get a huge variety of answers. Overwhelming majority think no though. I have nothing to offer you on the height issue though. I will say they are easy as others have stated to lower .
     
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  17. mabupa

    mabupa Registered

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    Welcome aboard! I say go for it and just be careful. Not sure of your age, but I think maturity/responsibility is important. Mine is lowered right now just for looks. Lowering it was an easy 30min. Job. Don't forget to post pictures if you get it. :-)

    Good luck.
     
  18. skydivr

    skydivr Jumps from perfectly good Airplanes Donating Member

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    Remember, 5'4 and 120lbs... You have to be strong enough to get it off you if it falls on you....with some modification(s) you can make it fit you, but don't bite off more than you can chew unless you are prepared for the consequences...
     
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  19. VaBusa

    VaBusa oRg Gal Staff Member Administrator Registered

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    Or you just never drop it on yourself ;)

    But yeah, fair point that skydivr makes because the weight is A LOT........it crosses my mind only when I'm riding alone. I try real hard to just not drop it, like most riders :banana:
     
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  20. fxrsyd

    fxrsyd Registered

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    I've been riding motorcycles for 40 years plus, 14 bikes later, and the last 25 years on Harely's, still own one that I'm now selling. I just bought a Busa about a month ago, always wanted one & finally got one, 1st sport touring bike, never looked back or regretted my decision.
    Hopefully, I can pass on some of my experience to you & others. I am a male, 5' 7", 29" inseam, with boots on, I'm sitting flat footed on bike at stops, seat is an after market type so don't know if its lower than stock height.
    Things to consider, the Busa is very top heavy, unlike a Harley which is heavier but lower to the ground, so while reversing your bike backward from any driveway that meets the road, the dip will bring bike up higher, so if your caught in between, you won't be able to balance the bike on both foot, if you can't hold it up, bike will lean & you must be strong enough to hold it, on one side of your body, or it will fall. If you come to a stop sign or stop light, in an fast stop or an emergency situation, you may find your bike leaning more to one side & must be able to support the weight. Be very observant when choosing your parking stalls, if its not level but on an incline, you will have a hell of a time attempting to reverse it out, or reverse your bike in the stall so this will not create a problem leaving. Heard a comment the other day, about parking your bike & locking it in gear so it won't move while you're not there & tip over, if it does and no one is there to assist you, can you pick it up by yourself? Once the bike is moving, weight & height is never an issue.
    I would assume that you would be mostly on your toes during stops, it's not a big issue, but maybe you could sit on a friends bike, or go down your local dealership to sit on a floor model & try it out to see if you would be comfortable in that position to handle the top heavy weight. If you lower your bike, it will help, realizing that it may affect handling.
    Lastly, if you are doing your own maintenance, ask a friend if you can try to put the bike on the front & rear type of stand, it's a little tricky but doable. I have a pitbull lift which I found the most easiest & brought the bike up effortless, used another type which couldn't hold the top heavy bike & it went over, had the fairing sliders so I only broke my right side mirror. Also have a paddock lift which is a lot easier.
    Reason why I bought a Busa, love this bike and really tired of fixing my Harley's for the last 25 years, hopefully, my next road in life is riding more & fixing less. Hayabusa isn't for everyone, male or female, but if it is, it's an awesome bike to own & ride. Being a woman and your size is not an obstacle, but conditions which I described that may make it harder to adjust. Mostly, be safe with the bike you choose on the road that fits you best, only you will know what is best for you, not your family, to enjoy your ride by yourself & with friends that share your same dreams.
    Aloha & good luck.
     
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