Want to thank someone for Twist of the Wrist





FloydV

Donating Member
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#1
It's been a while, but someone here recommended Twist of the Wrist as a good book for learning a lot of things about riding.

It's now Twist of the Wrist II, and you can get it at Amazon, and it's not a lot of money.

The most helpful thing to me was:

Don't fixate on the 50 or 100 yards in front of you. Look where you want to go. The bike almost goes there by itself. It is something I have to constantly work at, because it is natural to be afraid of the road and objects in front of you. You need to keep your eyes on the exit point of a curve. Peripheral vision will give you all the other info you need.

Another point was in setting a bike up for a curve. If you enter at the correct point of a curve, and know where you will exit it, you don't have go in so hot that your knee is scraping, and you exit just as fast, or faster.

Anyway, thanks to whoever it was.
 

Dr E

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#2
I will second that as years ago someone told me about the first edition. I kind of scuffed at the idea of "reading" about motorcycle riding technique. One of the cases...never judge a book by its cover. A great read and I still run through points when I am riding from the book.

Great idea to give props to the book!:beerchug::thumbsup:
 
#10
The riding course is outstanding. There's four basic levels. You do one level per course day. They travel around the country so, depending where you live, they could be near by. Poke "California Superbike School" into your browser and check the school out.
 
#13
i've found if you name your bike, and talk to him/her, they talk back and tell you thier limits and how to ride them. you will have more faith in the bike. i have some bikes i have named and they know where "we" want to go, i just gotta look there.
keep a deep seat, and a far away look.
busa busa :cheerleader: raa raa raa
 

JET-A

Wishing I was riding
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#14
I read "Twist 2" along with "Total Control" every year. And every year, I get more out of them. :thumbsup:
 

KOTH

Registered
#16
"A Twist of the Wrist - Volume II" - Keith Code
"Total Control" - Lee Parks

Both of the above are good and I learned good stuff from both. Doing a later entry into corners has helped me be better in turns on the street. It is in the Chapter 16 - Steering in Twist II.

I just ordered "Sport Riding Techniques" - Nick Ienatsch

Keeping these books in the reading rotation lets you pick up different tid-bits each time.

Have fun with your riding.
 

Mr Bogus

Trouble Makers Inc.
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#17
I try to keep in mind that a lot of that books tips are for the race track...

When cornering on the streets, you better be looking at the area in front of the bike for loose debris, leaf litter, gravel, oil, anti freeze or anything else that might compromise traction..
 

FloydV

Donating Member
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#18
I try to keep in mind that a lot of that books tips are for the race track...

When cornering on the streets, you better be looking at the area in front of the bike for loose debris, leaf litter, gravel, oil, anti freeze or anything else that might compromise traction..
I would agree completely. But, the book is not written (for the most part) for the street. By street, I mean in a city. Where would anyone try a high speed twistie in a city? In fact, high speed in any city invites disaster.
 

KOTH

Registered
#19
I try to keep in mind that a lot of that books tips are for the race track...

When cornering on the streets, you better be looking at the area in front of the bike for loose debris, leaf litter, gravel, oil, anti freeze or anything else that might compromise traction..
I think your focus should still be through the turn. I describe this as looking long and glancing short for the things you describe.
 

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