Virgin Islands





Hectic

Registered
#1
Hey guys. I've got a little situation here. I've been tentatively offered a job on St. John, in the US Virgin Islands. (I'm flying down on the 17th to meet the people in the company, take a final skills evaluation, and hammer out the details.) I've vacationed there, but never really did much looking into how the locals live. Has anyone spent enough time in the islands to give a viewpoint on the pros and cons of living there?

As far as I can see it, this job is going to pay me more money, for less hours, living in paradise, with great benefits and a similar cost of living, however, bringing the busa down (kind of a must) may present some problems, like the 20-35mph speed limit on the entire island, plus the condition of some roads, and the cost in transporting it to St. Thomas St. Croix or Jost Van Dyke for some better riding conditions. (I remember taking a taxi from Charlotte Amalie to red hook and chanting in my head "Its like the dragon, with palm trees" over and over.)

Ah well, I appreciate you taking the time to read this, but I am starting to get serious about this potential move, so I'm tapping any sources of information I can find. Thanks .org!

Ben


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SKnight

Registered
#4
Big thing with living on an island is the cost of living vs. potential income. Make sure you look into not only housing but food, gas, etc. Since everything has to come on a boat it gets pricey as Hell in areas that might not be so apparent at first.

Otherwise there are far worse places to make a living, so if the cost of living/income ratio is below where you are now,

GO FOR IT!
 

NickSully

Donating Member
Registered
#5
Island life is a lot slower than main land life. This may not apply to the US Virgin Islands but the time I spent in the Bahama's at a friend's beach house there was long periods of no power and no internet.

Like somebody mentioned all ready groceries where outrageous. I think a gallon of Milk cost something like 9 bucks and this was over two years ago. I also have friends in Costa Rica and they have a rainy season where you can expect a month or more of solid rain. You'll most likely need a 4x4 if you don't live on a paved road.

That's about all I can remember right now. Good luck with the job. :thumbsup:
 

Fastfrog007

Donating Member
Registered
#7
Can you go down a week early? Do some snoopin around. Pretend you live there, ask the locals, they know all the good and bad parts of life on the island.
 

jellyrug

Donating Member
Registered
#8
Ben

Go for it, it will be a great experience!!

I can share mine with you, will be finishing almost three years in American Samoa, population is about 2/3rds of where you are going and this is a working island, as opposed to your tourism island. Overall it was a good experience, but three years is enough.

The first six months was a great adventure, the following were OK and the last six months here are really a drag, same ol same. Spend a lot of time in Hawaii and even that has become a drag, you are land locked and can't go too far. The big old US of A becomes better the longer you stay away. We just tend to take things for granted when we are home.

Driving at 25-30 miles an hour takes some getting used to, but get home in mainland and twist the throttle on the Busa and you are in heavan.

Make sure they pay you for being remote, and the Virgin Islands are nicer than here, it will be a good experience.:thumbsup:

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MPH 200

Donating Member
Registered
#11
My Uncle lived in St. Croix for 13 years. Watch the thieves, they actually tell everyone not to lock your car because they will break the windows. Cost of living is more do to eveything being imported.
 

GoAWOL

Abiit, excessit, evasit
Donating Member
Registered
#12
As far as I can see it, this job is going to pay me more money, for less hours, living in paradise, with great benefits and a similar cost of living,
I think that statement pretty much sums it up. As far as the busa...just take the leap and rock one of these!:laugh::beerchug:

vespa.jpg
 
#13
bring your snorkel gear...its beautiful. dont show off your expensive stuff...they will follow you home and steal it...

If you are single be wary of the females...they may give you a gift that lasts forever...lol.
:poke:
 
#15
Ben

Go for it, it will be a great experience!!

I can share mine with you, will be finishing almost three years in American Samoa, population is about 2/3rds of where you are going and this is a working island, as opposed to your tourism island. Overall it was a good experience, but three years is enough.

The first six months was a great adventure, the following were OK and the last six months here are really a drag, same ol same. Spend a lot of time in Hawaii and even that has become a drag, you are land locked and can't go too far. The big old US of A becomes better the longer you stay away. We just tend to take things for granted when we are home.

Driving at 25-30 miles an hour takes some getting used to, but get home in mainland and twist the throttle on the Busa and you are in heavan.

Make sure they pay you for being remote, and the Virgin Islands are nicer than here, it will be a good experience.:thumbsup:
I'm going to guess here....but I'd bet the local LEO's are MUCH fewer & far between.
I'd say Go for it! Bring the BUSA and twist the wrist my man! :thumbsup:
Meanwhile when it's all sunny and in the uppper 70's there in the winter. We can all think about how much we want to say :moon: :moon: here from the East Coast.
 

zukracer

I'm somewhere but dont know where
Donating Member
Registered
#17
having spent a number of months down there, I would say dont take the busa. It will disappear. Get a low grade play toy and dont have anything tooo $$. The other thing to consider is finding a house to "house sit" rather than a traditional lease. you can probably find some deals in much nicer places. Groceries are going to be different, its not like home where you have whatever you want, the rum is cheaper than the water. Where on the island are you going to working? Doing? I would say find something around mongoose junction area, its closer to everything you will likely want but is also the tourist side of the island. Lots of good stuff to do there, just really will take some time to get used to the slower pace of things. Also make sure you get any of the local customs down, like dont walk into a bar with your shirt off or dont stick your thumb out to hitch a ride (just point with your finger), that type of thing. If I can answer anything let me know :cool:
 

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