Twistie RPM's





#3
BTW, good form, but you might want to drop your outside shoulder into the direction your turning. You look crossed up a bit in that picture.
 

Kento-Moto

Hayabusa Immortal
Donating Member
Registered
#6
BTW, good form, but you might want to drop your outside shoulder into the direction your turning. You look crossed up a bit in that picture.
HAHA ! Thats not me, I just liked the pic. :laugh:

I run sometimes low 4500 - 6K and my high would be about 7-8K but I am nervous and allways have been about drifting. I would get sideways in my old scca days in the car all the time but not on 2 wheels.

I dont have any good pics of me in the turns...

Riding_044b.jpg
 
#7
HAHA ! Thats not me, I just liked the pic. :laugh:

I run sometimes low 4500 - 6K and my high would be about 7-8K but I am nervous and allways have been about drifting. I would get sideways in my old scca days in the car all the time but not on 2 wheels.

I dont have any good pics of me in the turns...
Well then the "Not Kento" person is a bit crossed up. :laugh:

You actually stand a better chance of braking traction in the 4500-6000 range than you would in the 8000-11000 range because you're just entering your torque curves strongest area. If the tire breaks loose it will accelerate much more violently as it's cruising through the torque curve. If you are above the torque peak then will be less room for acceleration before the limiter stops it.

Of course, there are some turns that require using lower RPMs. Those turns you will want to be smoother as you roll on the throttle.
:beerchug:
 

Kento-Moto

Hayabusa Immortal
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#8
Doug, that is the best explanation of high revs I have ever heard, really, thank you.

When leaned over, I hate the torqi-ness of the fuel injection. It takes a bit of practice to be smooth. On Friday I was experimenting with higher R's in the turns and still make me pucker. :eek3:

Oh and I have over 80K miles on Busa's in the last 9 years but I allways am learning.



ol Red below, circa 2004

Miscfrom-laptop 038.jpg
 

Kento-Moto

Hayabusa Immortal
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#10
I was draggin toes alot this past friday on the same road as the above pic.

I think I need to replace my toe sliders. :whistle:
 
#12
I was draggin toes alot this past friday on the same road as the above pic.

I think I need to replace my toe sliders. :whistle:
Get your but off the seat a bit more, and stay on the balls of your feet in the corner. You should be pushing down on the inside foot peg with the ball of your foot, toe tucked a bit into the bike.
 
#13
This is not the best angle shot of me, but it shows what I'm doing with my feet and hands on the corner. Notice my foot is tight up against the bike, and my hand is on the and of the bar like a tennis racket. My butt is half off the seat.

This was at the entrance to a corner so I'm setting up for it.

(Please ignore the fact that my raincoat is blowing up like the Michilen Man.)

Doug@PR_061108_Small.jpg
 
#14
Depends on the road, if I know it well then third at 7-10K, if not then second at 9-11K for the very reasons TW mentioned. If I know the road then I'll carry more speed in and use more power coming out.

The biggest bit of advise I've gotten from track riding was about my feet. Balls on the pegs, actually get your toes pushing in, push down on the inside and spur the bike with your heels just like a cowboy on a horse. That nearly doubles your leverage at your knees and hips so now you can actually release all the pressure from your arms leaving them to steer smoothly with muscles not while holding up your weight.

135359092_9GLHc-XL.jpg


This is from the track day I learned that. I picked up a lot of things that first day, but when the control rider talked to me about that my times dropped a couple of seconds the very next session. Bad habits don't go away easily, my foot's turned out some there, but I had nearly zero pressure on the bars.
 
#15
You can point your outside toe out if it's more comfortable. But you are absolutely correct on using your legs to hold on, and being loose on the bars. That also allows you to get better feedback from the front tire and brakes.
 
#16
i find myself liking 5-6k entrance as well... long sweepers with my arse half off the seat, looking through the corner, sun shining and feeling my front tire hitting every nook and cranny as I power out of the corner... thats just fun.
 

Tufbusa

Track Coach / TufPoodle Coach
Registered
#17
A corner is a corner and the RPM is the same whether at the track or on the streets. Asphalt is asphalt and it's all hard if you crash.

This is what I tell students at the track. Keep your RPM in the top 25% range if at all possible in the corners. Upon corner exit, as you roll the power on count 1001, 1002, 1003. Begin rolling the power on at 1001 and have it at full throttle at 1003. This will keep you from spinning the rear tire when powering out of the corner. However, if you do spin the rear, being in the top 25% of the RPM range will keep the spin managable. If you spin the tire at the 50% RPM range it's going to be much more violent and far less managable.

If you are just playing and having fun without concern for good corner drive either on the track or street, you can use midrange throttle just fine as long as you are gentle on the throttle and roll the throttle slowly and smoothly using the counting method and you'll be just fine. If you get ham fisted in the midrange, you'll end up on your head. Almost every bike we pick up on the track that has highsided is always one gear to high for the corner.

When I ride on the back roads, I rarely use the high RPM range at all because all it acomplishes is pissin off the locals with all the noise and it sounds like you are doing triple digits whether you are or not. Since I never let myself get suckered into racing with anyone on the streets, I use mid range and squeeze the throttle ever so gently coming out of corners.

However, I can keep on the bumper of most all the street riders with easy throttle simply by choosing better lines through the corners. Riding corners fast and safely is more about line choice than throttle. Go ride with a group and you'll see some of the most fookered up folks on the planet when it comes to line choice. Makes you wonder how they survived as long as they have?

It's been my experience that poor line choice is the biggest culpret for guys crashing in the corners. Rarely are they going to fast if they would have had better skills at line choice.
 

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