Stock suspension settings for GenII




fadiizzaldin

Registered
Dears,

anyone knows what's the stock suspension setting (for both front an rear) and whats the fork oil weight on Gen II Busa?

Thanks,
 

Telboy2000

Registered
Stock fork oil is a Suzuki spec that is a weird weight...something around 5w.
Settings are

Front
comp............8 clicks out from fully clockwise
rebound........8 clicks out """
preload.... 6 turns out """

rear
comp........8 clicks out
rebound ......12 clicks out
preload.......manual says get the dealer to do it....but 10mm of thread above the locking rings suits most

however....these are so-so settings and don't really work on some roads
 

SimiPair

Registered
SportRider Magazine recommends:
Front spring 6 out, compression 7 out, rebound 6 out.
Rear spring 10mm, compression 7 out, rebound 7 out.
 

sixpack577

Top Gun
Registered
That's a shame...you might learn something
if you read your owner's manual...some good
info in there.
Some BS in there too, like the rear tire being set to 42 psi.

FallenArch is right, there is no correct or specific setting for everyone.
It's called suspension sag, and needs to be set for the specific rider's body weight(with gear).
 

BA BUSA

MotoGP Wannabe
Donating Member
Registered
Some BS in there too, like the rear tire being set to 42 psi.

FallenArch is right, there is no correct or specific setting for everyone.
It's called suspension sag, and needs to be set for the specific rider's body weight(with gear).
There is a correct answer for the OP's question. It's
in the owner's manual...those numbers are a base line.
 

sixpack577

Top Gun
Registered
There is a correct answer for the OP's question. It's
in the owner's manual...those numbers are a base line.
Still, like I said, it's BS.
If one rider weighs 150lbs and the next weighs 250lbs; how is there a "baseline" setting?
There cannot be. Sure, Suzuki gives you a random set-up recommendation, but that's all it is, random.
A free suspension sag set-up should come with the sale of every new sportbike.:beerchug:
 

BA BUSA

MotoGP Wannabe
Donating Member
Registered
Still, like I said, it's BS.
If one rider weighs 150lbs and the next weighs 250lbs; how is there a "baseline" setting?
There cannot be. Sure, Suzuki gives you a random set-up recommendation, but that's all it is, random.
A free suspension sag set-up should come with the sale of every new sportbike.:beerchug:

What was the question?
 

dadofthree

Seasoned Beef
Donating Member
Registered
Ba and Telboy2000 answered the question asked. Telboy2000 was specific. Everyone should know that these settings are baseline and typically for a 165 pound pilot from everything I've read. I also read that If you weighed north of 200 the Gen I couldn't be set perfectly because the suspension just wasn't designed for us big guys. I read that the Gen II had suspension upgrades ( heavier front fork springs ). Fallenarch and sixpack make good points. Setting the suspension right on these bikes is best left to experts and if you're a big boy and you want to set the bike perfect you better get on the phone with an expert an order fork internals and a new rear spring minimum.

I wonder how much delta there is if you set the bike in the summer and go riding during the winter.

This knucklehead has never touched the suspension on either Busa. Not an expert just opinionated :laugh:
 

E Zurcher

Registered
SportRider Magazine recommends:
Front spring 6 out, compression 7 out, rebound 6 out.
Rear spring 10mm, compression 7 out, rebound 7 out.
These are very close to the settings I use on my 09 and I weigh 250. Only diff is my spring preload (5 out) and rebound (5 out) on the front end. This makes the bike respond evenly front and rear on dips and concrete slabs. I found any increase in spring/compression/rebound damping from these settings made the bike too harsh. These settings were obtained through much trial and error and are optimised for comfort and slightly spirited riding in the twisties.

I have never bottomed my bike and it handles well for my style of riding and my abilities.

When I decide to refresh my front and back ends, I will have the suspension work done but I don't see doing it until it is needed. I am not a track guy and not overly agressive rider.


For someone over 250 lbs, setting sag is useless because the stock springs will not let you get there. My guess is you won't get there if you are over 225 or so bu I'm sure someone will chime in.
 

jellyrug

Donating Member
Registered
I have never bothered with that.

If I weigh myself and go to possibly better settings how is my ride going to improve?
 

BA BUSA

MotoGP Wannabe
Donating Member
Registered
I have never bothered with that.

If I weigh myself and go to possibly better settings how is my ride going to improve?
With your suspension adjusted properly, your braking
and handling will improve, tire wear will improve, ride
quality may diminish (suspension will be stiffer) with
practice you can increase you corner speed quit
a bit.
 

sixpack577

Top Gun
Registered
I have never bothered with that.

If I weigh myself and go to possibly better settings how is my ride going to improve?
BA Busa is spot on in his response.
Also consider that the stock suspension factory "settings" are really specific to no one in particular.
More so, I have bought a few new bikes over the years, and my friends combined have bought many.
I've set the sag on a lot of them.
Of all these bikes, you be surprised to know that most forks aren't even set the same left to right.
You never know where the suspension is set until you check it.
Garbage settings vs. proper sag is night and day.
Yes, it can result in a stiffer ride for the street, but then again it all depends how much sag you want/need.
My understanding has been 35 to 40mm for street, and 30 to 35mm for track(as tracks are much smoother).
If it's too harsh, then you can always increase sag some, as your riding is not at the level to need such handling; as in you want smooth and comfortable as opposed to railing corners.
Regardless, set the sag and be amazed. The suspension will work under the bike as it should. As opposed to being a pogo stick bouncing you over every bump, as well as sloppy handling and hard diving under heavy braking.
You'de be surprised the looks on people's faces once their sag is set. Even, bouncing the bike parked and turning a few clicks to make the suspension compress and rebound quickly(and without a double bounce at the return)can make a Big difference...then fine tune it by properly setting the sag.
Try it, you'll be amazed at what you've been missing.
I've been setting sag for a long time now. But it wasn't til a couple years back that TufBusa(old bastid), took some time on the phone with me. He finally made it click in my head exactly what was going on, and what to do, what to look for, how to adjust accordingly, ect. Have I improved? Most definitely. Am I an expert? Not even close.
If you get stuck, give Tuf a shout. He gets a bad rap for being brutally honest, but the man knows his stuff.:beerchug:
 

jellyrug

Donating Member
Registered
With your suspension adjusted properly, your braking
and handling will improve, tire wear will improve, ride
quality may diminish (suspension will be stiffer) with
practice you can increase you corner speed quit
a bit.
Thx for the reply.

When I said "I have never bothered with that" I meant on my Hayabusa. I have never ridden track with the Busa and never felt the need on the street to change anything by the way the bike behaves?

170lbs weight, without clothes. :whistle:

On my 600 Gixxer, which I rode on the track, different story. The front was way too soft, I had to adjust compression right up to the limit and do some work on the rear as well.

We have a gradual speed bump in our road, my Harley the suspension bottoms out at 20 mph. I have hit it with the Hayabusa at 60-70 mph, or lower. No problem, feels like a little hill. :laugh:

Guess that is why we call a Harley a Hardly. ???
 



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