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ogre

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Yeah, they're called ride height sensors. They're tricky to set up and figure how high you needed to get before it pulls how much timing but they can be effective.
Thats bad ass. They just laser to the tire?
 

busakiller

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Thats bad ass. They just laser to the tire?
The laser is pointed at the ground. So when the bike starts to wheelie the laser can tell the ecu the front is starting to wheelie and start pull timing out to help the bike not wheelie so you don’t have to chop the throttle. It can be tricky to get dialed in but once done it’s a great thing to have on a no bar bike
 

ogre

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The laser is pointed at the ground. So when the bike starts to wheelie the laser can tell the ecu the front is starting to wheelie and start pull timing out to help the bike not wheelie so you don’t have to chop the throttle. It can be tricky to get dialed in but once done it’s a great thing to have on a no bar bike
I'm guessing you need a standalone for this?
 

01smokes

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The laser is pointed at the ground. So when the bike starts to wheelie the laser can tell the ecu the front is starting to wheelie and start pull timing out to help the bike not wheelie so you don’t have to chop the throttle. It can be tricky to get dialed in but once done it’s a great thing to have on a no bar bike
Yup wheelie control and traction control will make it so so nice. Along with all the data you can get and log. It will make setting up the bike so much easier.
 

busakiller

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Yup wheelie control and traction control will make it so so nice. Along with all the data you can get and log. It will make setting up the bike so much easier.
Traction control is kinda pointless on a bike. If it spins the tire is going to go up in smoke before the standalone can do anything. On a car it’s different cause of how much tire you got and on big tire cars they like tire spin just a sorting amount of it to help the car leave and not shake the car.
 

01smokes

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Traction control is kinda pointless on a bike. If it spins the tire is going to go up in smoke before the standalone can do anything. On a car it’s different cause of how much tire you got and on big tire cars they like tire spin just a sorting amount of it to help the car leave and not shake the car.
TC will definitely help on the big end. when I use it down low on the cars might as well abort the run because it will be a trash run. But up top it definitely helps out.
 

ItsDooomz

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Traction control is kinda pointless on a bike. If it spins the tire is going to go up in smoke before the standalone can do anything.
That's really not how it works. "Active Traction control" in a modern racing ECU controls the rate of acceleration. You can set it up for percentage of slip using front and rear wheel speed sensors, G-Force meter and/or RPM over MPH or time. It won't make you faster but you won't go "up in smoke"
 

ogre

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TC will definitely help on the big end. when I use it down low on the cars might as well abort the run because it will be a trash run. But up top it definitely helps out.
TC based on wheel slip should technically make you faster. An article I read years ago claimed that the ideal % of slip in the drive wheels was in the neighborhood of 10%. So theoretically, you could set that slip rate in the ECU and just send it, and that *should be your ideal launch/60'
 

ItsDooomz

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Let me try to break this down for you. I'm just going to throw out random numbers to make this easier to understand. Let's say you have a motorcycle that has the potential to run 7.00 second 1/4 mile. We'll make this a high gear only / one speed motorcycle. Now we'll leave the starting line at 3000 RPMs and cross the finish line at 10,000 RPMs. Your RPM versus time plot is 1000 rpms per second. If the tire starts to spin the RPM / time plot goes higher than 1,000 RPMs per second and the ECU pulls timing to slow down the rate of engine acceleration. You can do the same thing with g-forces or similarly with wheel speed.
On radial/street tire bikes (and cars for that matter) you don't want any spinning/slipping. You want that thing to dead hook. Slick tire cars are different and they like a little bit of wheel speed early. They'll hook the tire, wrinkle the sidewall throw the car forward then you want to "get up on the tire" with some wheel speed as you advance down track. Traction control pulls timing away, it can't make you go faster but it can save you from a total aborted run. In a perfect world traction control will never activate, if it does, it can only slow you down.
 

ogre

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But we live in an imperfect world. 0% tire slip and keeping the front wheel down at wot is ideal, I'm just saying limiting slip to 10% until it hooks won't slow you down that much. Slew rate TC I'm not a fan of, because you have to basically guess what your max acceleration is, I mean tc using front v. rear wheel speed.
 

fallenarch

THE SLOW RIDER
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Theoretically, TC should allow you to go as fast as the conditions allow and do it consistently. As soon as the wheel breaks loose, the TC can react thousands of times faster than a rider to intervene. Old TC worked by either comparing front or rear wheel speed or looking at rates of increase in RPMs. Modern TC looks at both as well as bike position to determine if the rear wheel is slipping. It's fast and accurate. Bikes with race TC allow some amount of slippage as this is a good thing, especially in road racing.

What makes modern TC so good is the extremely fast processors and sensor rates they are running. The other factor is the algorithms that take all this information and decide how to react to it. I have read articles where riders (pros) say the TC used to require a certain riding style to get the max out of the bike. Older systems were too slow and were noticeably trying to react to what's already happened. The new stuff is predictive thanks to the algorithms, so it essentially reacting to what's about to happen. The result is a very natural feeling bike that riders feel more in control of. The bike doesn't shut the party down until the very last minute.

Interestingly, an electric drag bike should be awesome. 100% torque from 1 rpm and no shifting. With a good TC allowing you to launch at max traction, it would lay down some serious 1/4 mile passes. Might even be possible to get a 1/4 mile pass with big capacitors and no batteries?
 

Dnyce

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7A6E42AB-6597-4206-A137-C2B8A7FF7580.jpeg


What is that?
 

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