Ohlins vs New valves and forks?


#1
So I am going to upgrade the suspension but I'm kinda torn about which way to go. I have never riden a Busa with a upgraded suspension so I'm working on hearsay at this point. The ohlins are quite expensive. Is the Ohlins worth it over new springs and new valves on a gen 2? The stock forks are Diamond coated so internal changes should make they quite good I would think. Love to actually be able to try and upgraded suspension but don't know anyone in Ontario that has one :laugh:
 
#2
i had my inner springs swapped for +10 lbs/inch rate, thicker oil and reduced air gap.

nice alternative if you can't afford the ohlins, i did that, worked a treat
 

Tufbusa

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#3
It's difficult to beat Ohlins suspension components. Spendy but first class goods! If you are not involved in road racing or at least a track junky, you'll most likely find no noticeable difference on the street or occasional track day. You have to be capable of over-riding your current suspension before upgraded suspension will make a noticeable difference.

If money is no issue, Ohlins is genuine quality. If money is a precious commodity, Springs and Valves in your OEM forks is the next step up from stock. The most significant difference you'll notice is springs to suit you if you are a heavy weight in the saddle. If you are under 200 lbs your OEM suspension works pretty dang well when properly set up.
 

Tufbusa

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#4
i had my inner springs swapped for +10 lbs/inch rate, thicker oil and reduced air gap.

nice alternative if you can't afford the ohlins, i did that, worked a treat
I'm curious as to why you would install heavier springs then add more oil to increase resistance? If your spring rate is proper you would have no need for reduced air space within the tube, no? :dunno:
 

frisbee

GODSPEED RACING
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#5
Hey Tuf,
I'm 220lbs and am about to go with a set of racetech springs and gold valves for a better ride . I don't do any twisties but do alot of long rides plus my forks have over 50k on them now so they may be a little worn. Worth the swap or not in your opinion?
 

dadofthree

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#6
Tuf has well advised you. I always ask " how much do you weigh ? " If under 200 on Gen I, get a good adjustment and give it a try. Send me the $5K :laugh:
 

1busa

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#7
Haven't had the pleasure of riding a Busa with Ohlins suspension but you would be hard pressed to find anybody on any type of bike to talk bad about the quality of their products. Price however is a different story :whistle: I recently redone my forks and rear shock with race tech springs, race tech internals, fluids and an Eibach rear shock. Went to the race tech site and plugged in all my info and got the suspension set up for Me an my busa. Let me tell you it makes a difference! Well worth the money IMO and if it was that much a contrast from the stock setup I had I am curious to perhaps see 1 day what's the fuss all about Ohlins
 

Tufbusa

Track Coach / TufPoodle Coach
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#8
Hey Tuf,
I'm 220lbs and am about to go with a set of racetech springs and gold valves for a better ride . I don't do any twisties but do alot of long rides plus my forks have over 50k on them now so they may be a little worn. Worth the swap or not in your opinion?
You can't go wrong with investing in suspension. Much more beneficial IMO than adding HP. I look at suspension upgrades as "How much suspension do I need to fulfill my need". If money is no issue then buy the best suspension you can afford without loosing sleep over your bank account. You can spend more on your suspension than you will pay for a new busa. The question becomes, how much suspension do I need?

If I remember correctly you have a long swingarm and lowered, no? If so, you would benefit greatly with heavier springs on both ends and you should upgrade the valving in order to control the heavier springs. Even if you weren't stretched and lowered, at 220 #s you could use heavier springs. You may want to consider shortening the forks internally if you intend to keep her lowered?
 
#9
The price points from new valves and springs to a all new Ohlins forks is pretty high. Are we talking about a 10 percent increase in performance, 20, 30? Someone out there must have ridden both valved and New Ohlins forks to be able to speak a little about the performance differences from one to the other. On the stock suspension I am already riding it past its ability so an upgrade is absolutely necessary
 

rubbersidedown

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#10
I would also wonder how many ridders can actually ride past the abilities of stock suspension. If I had sacked componants,by all means I would upgrade.I bet there are thousands of sport bike riders who haven't even gone as far as a simple sag adjust. I feel I know a fair bit about most bikes in general, BUT would be all ears if somebody started a little on-line Busa suspension clinic.

Perhaps someone is up to the challenge. Keep it as simple and yet as scientific as possible. A little "Suspension Tuning for Dummies."

Tell us what that little thinga-ma-jiggy on top of the forks does,and how many turns a dude should start with.

When we sit on our bikes,how much should it sag to start with.

Interesting cool shi7 like that.

For both Gen I and II.


Where do I sign up...and who might lead the class. ???

RSD.
 
#12
I do my suspension tuning in 90 degree corners from a standstill. I take the corner with as much throttle as I can As you lean in the torque and lean angle punishes the suspension pretty good. I drive my neighbors crazy lol. Optimal suspension is only achieved at the razors edge of traction loss. Then u have to pay attention to if your front tire is sliding out, is your rear bouncing hard and losing traction. Takes some sensibility to figure out whats happening where at such high torque corners
 

Tufbusa

Track Coach / TufPoodle Coach
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#13
The price points from new valves and springs to a all new Ohlins forks is pretty high. Are we talking about a 10 percent increase in performance, 20, 30? Someone out there must have ridden both valved and New Ohlins forks to be able to speak a little about the performance differences from one to the other. On the stock suspension I am already riding it past its ability so an upgrade is absolutely necessary
Are you sure you are out riding your OEM suspension or are you out-riding your ability to properly set-up your suspension?

What is it that you want your suspension to do that it's not doing?

Here is a couple of photos of stock Gen I suspension with a 200 lb rider in action!

Greg PDX 1 .jpg


GregTH 1 .jpg
 
#15
If you mean Ontario the province, I can lend a hand. I am in Toronto and have OHlins road & track forks and Elka 4 way adjustable in the rear set correctly.

Busabim
 

frisbee

GODSPEED RACING
Donating Member
Registered
#16
You can't go wrong with investing in suspension. Much more beneficial IMO than adding HP. I look at suspension upgrades as "How much suspension do I need to fulfill my need". If money is no issue then buy the best suspension you can afford without loosing sleep over your bank account. You can spend more on your suspension than you will pay for a new busa. The question becomes, how much suspension do I need?

If I remember correctly you have a long swingarm and lowered, no? If so, you would benefit greatly with heavier springs on both ends and you should upgrade the valving in order to control the heavier springs. Even if you weren't stretched and lowered, at 220 #s you could use heavier springs. You may want to consider shortening the forks internally if you intend to keep her lowered?
Yes stretched and lowered, On the rear what do you recommend . I thought about cutting my forks , just not sure what that would really do since i'm just slid down an 1" now
 
#17
I'm curious as to why you would install heavier springs then add more oil to increase resistance? If your spring rate is proper you would have no need for reduced air space within the tube, no? :dunno:

why because, the suspension was bottoming out, from the std shop setting, i only weight 210 lbs, handles sweet and the front end,is less heavy
 
#18
I'm curious as to why you would install heavier springs then add more oil to increase resistance? If your spring rate is proper you would have no need for reduced air space within the tube, no? :dunno:
the bike was set up by experienced tuner and racer, 'MCT' suspension in UK is reknowned for optimal set up for most sports bikes
I arrived thinking i might see a slight improvement, .................i rode home 230 miles with a continuous grin on my face, difference like night and day, (rear suspension modded too)
 

rubbersidedown

BUSA-RIDIN'-BASTID
Donating Member
Registered
#19
I would also wonder how many ridders can actually ride past the abilities of stock suspension. If I had sacked componants,by all means I would upgrade.I bet there are thousands of sport bike riders who haven't even gone as far as a simple sag adjust. I feel I know a fair bit about most bikes in general, BUT would be all ears if somebody started a little on-line Busa suspension clinic.

Perhaps someone is up to the challenge. Keep it as simple and yet as scientific as possible. A little "Suspension Tuning for Dummies."

Tell us what that little thinga-ma-jiggy on top of the forks does,and how many turns a dude should start with.

When we sit on our bikes,how much should it sag to start with.

Interesting cool shi7 like that.

For both Gen I and II.


Where do I sign up...and who might lead the class. ???

RSD.
O well...guess I gotta make some phone calls. :laugh:

RSD.
 

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