Newbie neighbour crashes.





#1
I have a neighbour across the street who is new to riding as she just got her learners permit a month ago. She bought a 750 Shadow at the same time she got her permit and has been developing her skills since then riding with others she knows. I haven't been out with her on a ride yet so I don't know how she is doing firsthand but she seems very careful. When she first bought the bike and I noticed it in her garage I went over for a visit and gave her as many tips and advice as I could think of without trying to scare her. Well, last week I noticed that the Shadow wasn't in the garage and she was getting lots of visitors and greeting them with a sling on her arm. Turns out she was on a curvy road in our region with a group and riding in staggered formation....she drifted off the edge of the road on a bend and lost the rear in the gravel while trying to get back on the asphalt....it highsided her and she got 2 broken ribs, broken shoulderblade and collarbone, left thumb and a bit of rash.

She is now evaluating whether to remount when she gets her bike back or follow her family members & adult childrens advice and give it up all together. She is also wondering if she should have started with a smaller ride. I told her to not make any decisions until she gets her bike back and starts to heal. If she sees it in the garage and wants to ride then go for it....if not then make a decision for the future then.

I always tell new riders the same thing. Riding motorcycles requires a combination of skills to be safe. You have to be able to work both feet and hands and your eyes and brain at the same time while being able to scan and evaluate the situation around you and focus for long periods of time. Motorcycles are not for everyone and it is important to evaluate your abilities as to whether it is the lifestyle/activity for you.
 

Dino

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#2
All good tips.

When group riding you should not take the staggered formation so seriously that you forget how to enter a curve.
 
#4
Personally I am not a big fan of group rides for new riders. Unless you are with a really good group there is a good chance that you will be drawn into a pace that is beyond your skills and abilities and end up in trouble (unlike in road cycling when you get dropped off the back when you are out of your league). By yourself or with 1 or 2 others you can ride through the corners on your chosen line and at a speed you are comfortable with and not feel any pressure to keep up or feel confined or claustrophic in a tight formation.
 
#5
I had a friend go down at the track and broke his collarbone and a few ribs. He bought a new bike and only put 250 miles on it before he sold it. He has not bought another one in 2 years. Fear is real.
 

Dino

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#6
Personally I am not a big fan of group rides for new riders. Unless you are with a really good group there is a good chance that you will be drawn into a pace that is beyond your skills and abilities and end up in trouble (unlike in road cycling when you get dropped off the back when you are out of your league). By yourself or with 1 or 2 others you can ride through the corners on your chosen line and at a speed you are comfortable with and not feel any pressure to keep up or feel confined or claustrophic in a tight formation.
I agree but I also think that if you are riding with a group that doesn't feel responsible for newer riders you need to find another group to ride with.
 
#7
Some people are natural born riders. Others may never get the knack for riding. People are often amazed after riding with me to find out I have only been on the bike for a few months. I have rode with some people who have been riding for 2 years that just arent that comfortable on the bike. Riding in groups people tend to feel a safety that is imaginary. Can often be dangerous....
 
#8
Sounds like she might have been trying to keep up with the group and not riding her own ride. Very important to stress that if you dont feel comfortable with the pace, ride in a manner that makes you feel safe, people will wait and make sure you get to where your going, if your with responsible riders.
 

Professor

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#10
Has she had a MSF course or is she relying on friends to teach her these skills?

I suggest an MSF BRC regardless to regain her confidence. Even if she has taken it before it will lower the tension level quite a bit before she gets back on the bike.

The Shadow 750 is not the best beginner bike, but it will work better than most.

FWIW, my wife started on a Shadow 750 and it served her well for 3 years until we upgraded her to a V-Rod.
 
#11
Has she had a MSF course or is she relying on friends to teach her these skills?

I suggest an MSF BRC regardless to regain her confidence. Even if she has taken it before it will lower the tension level quite a bit before she gets back on the bike.

The Shadow 750 is not the best beginner bike, but it will work better than most.

FWIW, my wife started on a Shadow 750 and it served her well for 3 years until we upgraded her to a V-Rod.
+1,000 :thumbsup:
 
#12
Has she had a MSF course or is she relying on friends to teach her these skills?

I suggest an MSF BRC regardless to regain her confidence. Even if she has taken it before it will lower the tension level quite a bit before she gets back on the bike.

The Shadow 750 is not the best beginner bike, but it will work better than most.

FWIW, my wife started on a Shadow 750 and it served her well for 3 years until we upgraded her to a V-Rod.


Yes, she did do the MSF course and passed that and since then she has been doing rides with coworkers or friends. With the group ride thing it would be ideal if new riders would communicate to the group if they were uncomfortable with the pace or other aspects but then many new riders don't feel comfortable passing these messages along....they don't want to slow everybody up or be a pain in the arse, etc.....peer pressure is a wonderful thing.
 

IG.

Registered
#13
She has to feel comfortable on the bike riding alone, and if riding with a group doesn't feel right, she should break away, or at the least communicate with the group. Nothing wrong saying the pace is a bit quick for her comfort.

I agree with someone saying that riding in a group creates false sense of safety. I'd say that generally, riding in a group is more dangerous than riding solo.

She also needs to analyze what happened, and what she should've done differently? She simply didn't pay attention and drifted, or she felt she "just couldn't make the turn" at that speed. Such analysis helps to come to terms with what happened and move on instead of being scared of very turn.
 

Dino

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#14
Yes, she did do the MSF course and passed that and since then she has been doing rides with coworkers or friends. With the group ride thing it would be ideal if new riders would communicate to the group if they were uncomfortable with the pace or other aspects but then many new riders don't feel comfortable passing these messages along....they don't want to slow everybody up or be a pain in the arse, etc.....peer pressure is a wonderful thing.
I agree to a point but like I said I think it is the responsibility of the group ride captains to get a feel for who the newer riders are and watch out for them. Not everyone feels comfortable saying they are new. I ave led several rides and if someone new shows up I make it a point to ask them how much ride time they have and then lead the group accordingly.
 
#15
I have a neighbour across the street who is new to riding as she just got her learners permit a month ago. She bought a 750 Shadow at the same time she got her permit and has been developing her skills since then riding with others she knows. I haven't been out with her on a ride yet so I don't know how she is doing firsthand but she seems very careful. When she first bought the bike and I noticed it in her garage I went over for a visit and gave her as many tips and advice as I could think of without trying to scare her. Well, last week I noticed that the Shadow wasn't in the garage and she was getting lots of visitors and greeting them with a sling on her arm. Turns out she was on a curvy road in our region with a group and riding in staggered formation....she drifted off the edge of the road on a bend and lost the rear in the gravel while trying to get back on the asphalt....it highsided her and she got 2 broken ribs, broken shoulderblade and collarbone, left thumb and a bit of rash.

She is now evaluating whether to remount when she gets her bike back or follow her family members & adult childrens advice and give it up all together. She is also wondering if she should have started with a smaller ride. I told her to not make any decisions until she gets her bike back and starts to heal. If she sees it in the garage and wants to ride then go for it....if not then make a decision for the future then.

I always tell new riders the same thing. Riding motorcycles requires a combination of skills to be safe. You have to be able to work both feet and hands and your eyes and brain at the same time while being able to scan and evaluate the situation around you and focus for long periods of time. Motorcycles are not for everyone and it is important to evaluate your abilities as to whether it is the lifestyle/activity for you.
Great advice rider.Keep passing it on.. :thumbsup: Ride safe .. ;)
 

miserycaptain

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#18
bazooki's QUOTE:

I always tell new riders the same thing. Riding motorcycles requires a combination of skills to be safe. You have to be able to work both feet and hands and your eyes and brain at the same time while being able to scan and evaluate the situation around you and focus for long periods of time. Motorcycles are not for everyone and it is important to evaluate your abilities as to whether it is the lifestyle/activity for you.
bazooki [/QUOTE]

This is the best it can be said for sure. Best wishes to her for a speedy recovery and the right choice.
 
#19
I say keep on going. Family and friends will tell her to stop and that is enough. We all have to go down at some time in order to learn how to respect the ride. Just my opinion.
 

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