newb question on suspension


black diamond busa

Team Jacob
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#1
So been doing a lot of reading and just figured I would ask people that know more than me. When you have total traction why does the bike lift the front tire instead of just keeping in down and going faster?
 

twotonevert

Member of P.E.A.
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#2
Just a thought out loud, but the rotation of the tire coupled to the chain and the torque of the engine naturally wants to lift the front. Same as a car, ever see pro street cars do a wheelie on the track?
 
#3
Am not an expert but I know that its also a matter of for every action there is an opposite reaction. The torque generated makes the wheel turn forward, the bike will then want to turn backwards. Imagine looking at the bike from the right side as the wheel turns. The wheel will turn clockwise, then the bike will want to go anticlockwise, which is up in this case.
 

black diamond busa

Team Jacob
Registered
#5
Am not an expert but I know that its also a matter of for every action there is an opposite reaction. The torque generated makes the wheel turn forward, the bike will then want to turn backwards. Imagine looking at the bike from the right side as the wheel turns. The wheel will turn clockwise, then the bike will want to go anticlockwise, which is up in this case.
So instead of breaking traction the motor just wants to spin the bike around the wheel?
 
#6
With enough traction instead of wasting power via wheel spin all that torque is transferred to the ground. So yes with enough force the motor will want to spin the bike around the wheel. I hear motorcross guys use this concept when in the air when they see that they will land too much on the front wheel and crash. I hear they rev the bike in the air to spin the wheel forward which makes the bike turn in mid air and lands on the rear wheel. Not sure but I heard that they do that.
 

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