New Tire Break-in- accelerated


Shibumi

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Registered
#1
Put a new Qualifier on the back Wednesday, and decided I did NOT want to pussyfoot around for 100 or so miles wearing whatever-the-hell it is off the tread before I could trust it to deliver excellent traction.

SO, borrowing from another post about oiling the chain in a quick convenient manner- I put the bike up on the rear stand, started it up and shifted to first, then second with the fast idle still on. Took a 4"x12" piece of 150 grit sandpaper and held it tightly by the ends and applied it first to half the tire, then the other half. Held it tightly on one side from edge to slightly overlapping the center and counted to ten, then shifted to the other side. Did this for a total of thirty seconds on each side, then shut it down to check my work. This was the result.





I rode about 50 miles before taking the pics (impatient!) but you can see there is NO shiny film left on the tire so I believe it is broken in at this point!
smile.gif


Didn't have a chance to push it on a warm road yet, but I will the first chance I get.

Can anyone think of any drawbacks to this? The only reason for the 100 mile thing is some sort of treatment/coating on a new tire correct? Any reason why this procedure wouldn't completely take care of the problem?
 

Red05

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#4
Ready for a coat of primer!
biggrin.gif
I've often wondered if that would work, Shib. I broke mine in riding to the Meet'n'Greet from Springfield and still had the little tits on the rear halfway through Saturday's ride. That doesn't say much about my aggressiveness........
 

semi

Whoooosh!
Moderator
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#5
hey, this gives me a good idea on how to get rid of my chicken strips
laugh.gif


seriously though, i've never thought about this...i just took off for a couple hours of scenic riding and gradually picked up the speed...hope it works for you
 

WWJD

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#7
I don't know for certain, but I have read and heard that break in involves heat cycling the tire, not just removing the protectant coating. So I've heard/read.


* Disclaimer: The above statement consists only of hearsay by a random unknown individual from the internet who can not be held liable for information miscontrued or the malification of evidence hereto for facto proven en passant to the knowledge of frudential prostimuses under the act of 1974 freedom of disinformation act which heretofore not withstanding could therefore e pluibum unum ifo facto tonka cerebellum contortionist plagrant malfortune famasticating engineers.
 

jessup

Just because the dog eats it doesnt mean
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#8
(WWJD @ Sep. 29 2006,13:17) I don't know for certain, but I have read and heard that break in involves heat cycling the tire, not just removing the protectant coating.   So I've heard/read.


* Disclaimer:  The above statement consists only of hearsay by a random unknown individual from the internet who can not be held liable for information miscontrued or the malification of evidence hereto for facto proven en passant to the knowledge of frudential prostimuses under the act of 1974 freedom of disinformation act which heretofore not withstanding could therefore e pluibum unum ifo facto tonka cerebellum contortionist plagrant malfortune famasticating engineers.
that was funny. I agree though I have also heard that heat cycles are important in breaking in a tire.

My friend did the exact same break in method as Shibumi and his tire still felt slick as goose crap when I rode the bike.
 

UR IT!

MIDNIGHT FALCON
Donating Member
Registered
#10
I don't think anything could totally replace full load break-in of a tire, so be careful out there when you start getting comfortable........
wink.gif
 

BA BUSA

MotoGP Wannabe
Donating Member
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#13
(Shibumi @ Sep. 29 2006,08:20) Put a new Qualifier on the back Wednesday, and decided I did NOT want to pussyfoot around for 100 or so miles wearing whatever-the-hell it is off the tread before I could trust it to deliver excellent traction.

SO, borrowing from another post about oiling the chain in a quick convenient manner- I put the bike up on the rear stand, started it up and shifted to first, then second with the fast idle still on. Took a 4"x12" piece of 150 grit sandpaper and held it tightly by the ends and applied it first to half the tire, then the other half. Held it tightly on one side from edge to slightly overlapping the center and counted to ten, then shifted to the other side. Did this for a total of thirty seconds on each side, then shut it down to check my work. This was the result.





I rode about 50 miles before taking the pics (impatient!) but you can see there is NO shiny film left on the tire so I believe it is broken in at this point!
smile.gif


Didn't have a chance to push it on a warm road yet, but I will the first chance I get.

Can anyone think of any drawbacks to this? The only reason for the 100 mile thing is some sort of treatment/coating on a new tire correct? Any reason why this procedure wouldn't completely take care of the problem?
If you think that scuffing your tire with some sandpaper is going to break it in...please take some good pics of your crash and post them  
wink.gif


HEAT as in heat cycles are needed for a street tire to "cook off" the chemicals in a new tire...you can do it in 50-100 miles on the right road...but you need some "HEAT" and you also need to gradually increase your lean angle...for most riders 100 or so miles of twisties on two different days for a total of 200 and you're GTG  
wink.gif


wink.gif
 

PaNDeM1C

Your Disease.....
Donating Member
Registered
#14
When I got my DQ's on I took it right out on the freeway and went for a little speeding... then rode home.

What's more fun?

1. Breaking in tires in your garage?
2. Breaking in tires while riding?

Hmm... let me think...

I'll go with #2.
 

JINKSTER

I Love my Wife!
Donating Member
Registered
#15
(Shibumi @ Sep. 29 2006,05:20) Put a new Qualifier on the back Wednesday, and decided I did NOT want to pussyfoot around for 100 or so miles wearing whatever-the-hell it is off the tread before I could trust it to deliver excellent traction.

SO, borrowing from another post about oiling the chain in a quick convenient manner- I put the bike up on the rear stand, started it up and shifted to first, then second with the fast idle still on. Took a 4"x12" piece of 150 grit sandpaper and held it tightly by the ends and applied it first to half the tire, then the other half. Held it tightly on one side from edge to slightly overlapping the center and counted to ten, then shifted to the other side. Did this for a total of thirty seconds on each side, then shut it down to check my work. This was the result.





I rode about 50 miles before taking the pics (impatient!) but you can see there is NO shiny film left on the tire so I believe it is broken in at this point!
smile.gif


Didn't have a chance to push it on a warm road yet, but I will the first chance I get.

Can anyone think of any drawbacks to this? The only reason for the 100 mile thing is some sort of treatment/coating on a new tire correct? Any reason why this procedure wouldn't completely take care of the problem?
1st off?...please realize that this response is written with love for my fellow riders out there and not intended to offend....and the folowing is jmho but?...here's what i see wrong with this picture...

1. How'd ya scuff in the front?...I mean...i don't mind my rear gett'in a 'lil fishy...i can recover from that...but..if the front washes out?...you gotz problems...big problems....didja scuff'em both in?

2. When i got my first set of quali's mounted up?...i was amazed at the "Stick" they had...from right off the bat...and "Scuff-In" occured in the 1st mile or two...in the following fashion...

a. First i did some agressive straight up braking for about the first mile and then?....

b. For the second mile?...I ramped'er up to about 45-60mph and began doing some "Slalom Exercises"...starting out with a gradual slalom and progressively leaning her over further and further...until i drug a toe and called that "good enough"...and then rode the pi$$ out of'em the rest of the way home.

in all?...it took about...2 miles...3 minutes....no sandpaper...and no rubber dust to sweep up afterwards.....and for bonus points?..both the front and rear tires were "properly" scuffed in.

side-note: here's a comment i heard while watching caveman TV up at the fall busa bash that i'd like to share here...

"I once knew a guy who rode so slow that his chicken strips actually CAME BACK"

and when i heard that?...i almost sprayed my drink across the picnic table and nearly fell outta my chair!
laugh.gif


L8R, Bill.
cool.gif
 

Shibumi

Donating Member
Registered
#16
Thanks for the input Jinks- the front wasn't new, just the rear.

I like your breakin better- my last new rear I hated taking curves and worrying about if it was going to slip or not, just felt paranoid until I reached the 100 mile mark.

If that's all it takes to break it in, no big deal- that's easy!!
smile.gif



P.S.- Figured I'd get some
flamethrowingsmiley.gif
on this one, but was curious enough to do it anyway. Thanks for being gentle guys!
laugh.gif
 

GSXcite

Squirrel Master
Donating Member
Registered
#17
The last two new tires I installed, I went for a ride to scuff them in and ended up in a driving rain storm. Exciting would be the word to discribe the handling of the bike on new tires on wet pavement, but when the road is dry, they really feel great.
 

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