Looking for O% anti squat





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#24
Things have change. You use to want a lot of squat. Fast compression and slow rebound. Not the case anymore.

Look at pro street class bikes over the last 2 years or so. You’ll notice that the swing arm pivot is higher then the axle with the rider on it at the line on the real fast bikes. This is even more true in the grudge world with 21” over arms running a radial tire.

At the initial hit because the pivot is higher then the axle the rear tire essentially is trying to drive under the bike thus driving the tire in to the ground, flattening out the tire. Then about 10 foot out they’ll start to squat hard when the power starts pouring on. Vs 5 years ago they would squat right at the hit.
 
#25
Things have change. You use to want a lot of squat. Fast compression and slow rebound. Not the case anymore.

Look at pro street class bikes over the last 2 years or so. You’ll notice that the swing arm pivot is higher then the axle with the rider on it at the line on the real fast bikes. This is even more true in the grudge world with 21” over arms running a radial tire.

At the initial hit because the pivot is higher then the axle the rear tire essentially is trying to drive under the bike thus driving the tire in to the ground, flattening out the tire. Then about 10 foot out they’ll start to squat hard when the power starts pouring on. Vs 5 years ago they would squat right at the hit.
But with the kind of power he's talking about using, wouldn't he want it to squat off the hit?
 
#31
Things have change. You use to want a lot of squat. Fast compression and slow rebound. Not the case anymore.

Look at pro street class bikes over the last 2 years or so. You’ll notice that the swing arm pivot is higher then the axle with the rider on it at the line on the real fast bikes. This is even more true in the grudge world with 21” over arms running a radial tire.

At the initial hit because the pivot is higher then the axle the rear tire essentially is trying to drive under the bike thus driving the tire in to the ground, flattening out the tire. Then about 10 foot out they’ll start to squat hard when the power starts pouring on. Vs 5 years ago they would squat right at the hit.
See this is the exact type of info I was looking for
:super::thumbsup::banana:

The fact that you even mentioned the grudge scene means you know exactly what I'm talking about

Earlier I mentioned seeing some grudge bikes either squating from the hit or seem to jus hook and go

The ones that jus hooked and went did have some downward angle front to back pivot to axle, I also noticed they didnt wheelie as much either

But the ones that would squat at the hit would hook and be prone to wheelie, I'm guessing they run out of shock travel

The thing is, i mostly run on the street, call it no prep street grudge if u will, to have no squat on initial hit would mean a spinin smoke machine fighting for traction everywhere, seen it too many times

I need as much weight transfer as I can get on initial hit without running outta shock travel as possible, while also trying to control wheelies would be the next obstacle,...tuning tuning tuning I would guess

Looking forward to your response, awaiting your expertise
 

ogre

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#32
Two things:
One, take it to the track, it's incredibly dangerous and irresponsible to run at the speeds these bikes are capable of on the street, and not just risky to you. Last thing you want to do is smash into someone's 5 year old daughter crossing the street and turning her into jello. Let that sink in for a minute. You about to cry? Good. Now, assuming you're out late at night, in the boonies, away from other people, you're still putting yourself at significant risk, but you're a grown up and if you want to risk yourself, that's on you, just make sure your life insurance covers risky activities.

Second thing, what engine management are you running? I'd imagine the ideal thing on a surface with sketchy traction would be integrating some sort of traction control, since dialing in a super consistent launch wouldn't be as advantageous as it would on a nicely prepped track.
 
#33
Two things:
One, take it to the track, it's incredibly dangerous and irresponsible to run at the speeds these bikes are capable of on the street, and not just risky to you. Last thing you want to do is smash into someone's 5 year old daughter crossing the street and turning her into jello. Let that sink in for a minute. You about to cry? Good. Now, assuming you're out late at night, in the boonies, away from other people, you're still putting yourself at significant risk, but you're a grown up and if you want to risk yourself, that's on you, just make sure your life insurance covers risky activities.

Second thing, what engine management are you running? I'd imagine the ideal thing on a surface with sketchy traction would be integrating some sort of traction control, since dialing in a super consistent launch wouldn't be as advantageous as it would on a nicely prepped track.
Hmmm, I like grape jello

So as far as I know as i sits today, everything is stock besides air box mod, k&n, pair valve, Yoshi slip ons, 17/43, 3rd owner of the bike, had it abt 2months now...there's a cut-out for a sidewinder exhaust from a previous owner that hints to me maybe some ecu mapping but the jerky low speed throttle response says otherwise maybe also lol

Anyway...

As for traction control, clutch hand throttle hand+ a little luck is the only way for me, a 2step is handy tho lol

All I wanna know is a little bit of suspension geometry knowledge to apply to the street, the guys I run with have no idea about geometry at all and I believe it will give me a tuning edge

Anti squat and shock tuning IMO is a make or break deal for me at the moment:super::banana::race:
 

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