I wish I was a dog




Vonderbach

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Because then my biggest dilemma in life would be, do I drink from the bathtub faucet or the toilet?


I think the choice is obvious.
 

Vonderbach

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I guess you had to be there. I woke up this morning and my dog was just so damn happy to see me, and I couldn't help but think how simple his life must be.

And yes, I have a very weird sense of humor. :whistle:
 

Mrs.Rubber2Burn

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I wish I had my parent's beagle's life. His biggest decision is which sofa to sleep on all day, which pillow to allow my parents to sleep on; and how spoiled he is going act until he gets "his way", which I may add is the ONLY way around the house.

When he needed neck surgery, he saw a doggie neck surgeon for a mere $5k, and then physical therapy.

He doesn't even have a job! Lol! I know get out of FANTASY LAND and go back to work!!
 

Benesesso

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I fear I have no clue what this means. ???
Here, try this.

>"Edison, as noted above, had been working hard to link AC with death in the mind of the public, solely to protect his own investment in DC technology. In 1887, his staff collected reports of deaths involving AC in a pamphlet called "A Warning." With reporters present, Edison conducted demonstrations at his laboratory in West Orange, New Jersey, killing cats and dogs by luring them onto a metal plate wired to a 1,000 volt AC generator. In 1888, after Harold P. Brown, a former Edison employee, wrote a letter to the New York Post decrying yet another death by electrocution, Edison re-hired Brown. New York's selection of electrocution for executions gave Edison a new front on which to wage his battle, and Brown led the charge.

Working at Edison's laboratory, with Columbia's Dr. Fred Peterson as his assistant, Brown designed an electric chair. At Columbia, they staged a new series of experiments, in July and August of 1888, for public officials and reporters. They applied different levels of current from AC and DC systems to several stray dogs showing that while DC only brought agony, AC brought death. Their first victim was a Newfoundland. In the next several weeks, they made their point with more than 20 dogs. Edison himself offered a bounty of 25 cents for every animal caught and delivered for the experiments. In December, they electrocuted two calves and a horse, showing that the size of the subject was not an issue. And lest anyone fail to grasp the point, Edison asked, "Is this what your wife should be cooking with?" or "Should this power be in your sleeping child's bedroom wall?""<
 

Projekt

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Here, try this.

>"Edison, as noted above, had been working hard to link AC with death in the mind of the public, solely to protect his own investment in DC technology. In 1887, his staff collected reports of deaths involving AC in a pamphlet called "A Warning." With reporters present, Edison conducted demonstrations at his laboratory in West Orange, New Jersey, killing cats and dogs by luring them onto a metal plate wired to a 1,000 volt AC generator. In 1888, after Harold P. Brown, a former Edison employee, wrote a letter to the New York Post decrying yet another death by electrocution, Edison re-hired Brown. New York's selection of electrocution for executions gave Edison a new front on which to wage his battle, and Brown led the charge.

Working at Edison's laboratory, with Columbia's Dr. Fred Peterson as his assistant, Brown designed an electric chair. At Columbia, they staged a new series of experiments, in July and August of 1888, for public officials and reporters. They applied different levels of current from AC and DC systems to several stray dogs showing that while DC only brought agony, AC brought death. Their first victim was a Newfoundland. In the next several weeks, they made their point with more than 20 dogs. Edison himself offered a bounty of 25 cents for every animal caught and delivered for the experiments. In December, they electrocuted two calves and a horse, showing that the size of the subject was not an issue. And lest anyone fail to grasp the point, Edison asked, "Is this what your wife should be cooking with?" or "Should this power be in your sleeping child's bedroom wall?""<
Edison did this to fight Genius Nikola Tesla's superior technology.
 

Takeuon

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Or.... so my idiot human masters can dress me up like this and carry me around in a purse :errrr:

dog.jpg
 

Benesesso

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Edison did this to fight Genius Nikola Tesla's superior technology.
He sure did. Tesla had teamed up with George Westinghouse, and they knew that the electrification of the country would require AC because of the ease of stepping the voltage way up for long distance travel, and then stepping it way down.

After killing numerous dogs and other animals, including a circus elephant (a video is on Youtube), Edison managed to have high voltage AC used to execute a killer in prison. The execution was botched, as the voltage was too low for the first attempt (~1,000 volts). They only applied it for ~17 seconds, and the killer was unconscious but still breathing.

So they raised the volts to ~2,000 and applied it for 4 solid minutes. They just about BBQ'd him to the point that reporters tried in vain to flee the chamber.

G. West. stated they would have done better if they had used an axe. Edison made sure the newspapers used his new word, "The killer was Westinghoused".

One good point to be learned if you do any welding. DC IS safer, and low voltage AC, as low as ~40 volts, can easily stop your heart! Be REAL careful if you use a buzz-box AC power supply with stick, and for TIG welding on aluminum using AC.
 

Vonderbach

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Edison was brilliant, but DC was such a failure. Of course, without DC, we might not be able to wire up our LED lights! :laugh:
 



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