Gas prices rise along with interest in motorcycles





#1
Gas prices rise along with interest in motorcycles


Interest in motorcycles and scooters has risen rather dramatically along with the increase in fuel prices. While we can appreciate the reduced cost of operation that sometimes goes along with choosing a motorcycle over four-wheeled transport, the enjoyment some of us get from bikes easily eclipses our desire to save at the pump. After all, this particular blogger has been riding since the days of buck-a-gallon gas. Still, the growing trend of drivers dropping half their wheels in the name of gas conservation deserves close examination and has even caught the attention of Consumer Reports. In fact, a recent survey conducted by the group has found that a staggering 26-percent of respondents have considered downsizing from four wheels to two. According to CR, their team is intently studying this two-wheeled phenomenon in an effort to become acquainted with the products on the market, how often they are ridden and the newly-found fuel savings of their riders.
 
#2
Until alternative fuel becomes accepted standard, 2 wheel (or 3) still gets the best fuel economy around (even compared to hybrids). Depending on riding style, a person can cut annual fuel spending in half (~2-3000 dollars or more). Not to mention lower maintenance cost per mile compared to 4 wheel.
 
#4
Gas prices have fallen so much since last summer that I'm not sure the price of gas has made people want to buy motorcycles. I think warmer weather for summer has influenced that, just like it does every summer. dadof3 is right, you couldn't find a moped or scooter for sale unless you knew someone personally selling one.
 
#5
Ironically, motorcycles are not necessarily cheaper to operate. They generally require more maitenance and, beyond liability, are more expensive to insure. They do save on gas consumption, but as a dollar value, it doesn't make up for the increased cost of ownership that most folks would experience.

I've gotten as high as 45 mpg on my bike vs a high of 30 mpg on my car. I travel about 10,000 miles/year in my car which equals about 333 gallons of gas, assuming I get my best 30 mpg. If I replace those miles with bike miles and assume I get my bikes best of 45 mpg, that's about 222 gallons or about 111 less than the car. Assuming an average price per gallon of $2.50, That's a savings of $555 annually/per 10,000 miles. Certainly a significant amount on it's own. However, to realize that fuel savings I had to spend $11,000 for the bike/tax/title. In order to break even on those costs, I would have to drive 210,000 trouble free miles without worrying about ANY maintenance costs. Let's keep in mind that tires alone will need to be replaced every 2,000 (extremely agressive) to 10,000 (extremely conservative) miles, oil changes every few thousand miles, not to mention forks, shocks, chains, sprockets, etc. Oh, and let's not forget about riding gear. I'm CHEAP and I've got well over $1,000 in gear that is JUST for riding.

Unfortunately, the bottom line, is that getting a bike for financial savings based on lower fuel consumption is pure folly. Get a bike to enjoy it. Get a bike to reduce fuel emissions/be green. But don't get it to save money. It's a big toy, a luxury, an wholly UN-necessary expenditure that simply brings great joy to those who "get the bug", but in no way will it save you money.

PS: The caveat, of course, is that you may save money IF that is your entire goal and you buy a cheap bike, get liability only insurance, get rid of your car, ride in all conditions, never have an accident of any sort, do all your own maitenance, ride conservatively to preserve the vehicle longevity, etc. But, seriously, does that sound like fun?
 
#6
Ironically, motorcycles are not necessarily cheaper to operate. They generally require more maitenance and, beyond liability, are more expensive to insure. They do save on gas consumption, but as a dollar value, it doesn't make up for the increased cost of ownership that most folks would experience.

I've gotten as high as 45 mpg on my bike vs a high of 30 mpg on my car. I travel about 10,000 miles/year in my car which equals about 333 gallons of gas, assuming I get my best 30 mpg. If I replace those miles with bike miles and assume I get my bikes best of 45 mpg, that's about 222 gallons or about 111 less than the car. Assuming an average price per gallon of $2.50, That's a savings of $555 annually/per 10,000 miles. Certainly a significant amount on it's own. However, to realize that fuel savings I had to spend $11,000 for the bike/tax/title. In order to break even on those costs, I would have to drive 210,000 trouble free miles without worrying about ANY maintenance costs. Let's keep in mind that tires alone will need to be replaced every 2,000 (extremely agressive) to 10,000 (extremely conservative) miles, oil changes every few thousand miles, not to mention forks, shocks, chains, sprockets, etc. Oh, and let's not forget about riding gear. I'm CHEAP and I've got well over $1,000 in gear that is JUST for riding.

Unfortunately, the bottom line, is that getting a bike for financial savings based on lower fuel consumption is pure folly. Get a bike to enjoy it. Get a bike to reduce fuel emissions/be green. But don't get it to save money. It's a big toy, a luxury, an wholly UN-necessary expenditure that simply brings great joy to those who "get the bug", but in no way will it save you money.

PS: The caveat, of course, is that you may save money IF that is your entire goal and you buy a cheap bike, get liability only insurance, get rid of your car, ride in all conditions, never have an accident of any sort, do all your own maitenance, ride conservatively to preserve the vehicle longevity, etc. But, seriously, does that sound like fun?
Are you related to Debbie?


Debbie Downer? :poke:
 
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