Damping Rod Jam Nut Spacing?




#1
Got all my parts and oil in and have a question with the assembly?

GENII Showa Forks

What does changing the spacing on the damping rod jam nut do. When disassembling I measured 15.85MM from the top of the jam nut to the top of the rod?
Does changing this make a difference with the rebound adjustment? :dunno:

I changed from OEM springs to Traxxion 1.1 spring rate and going with 10W oil.

I also cut 80MM from the plastic spring holder as suggested from Traxxion.

When setting oil level height to 110MM is that with the spring in or out?

Jam Nut.jpg
 

Tufbusa

Track Coach / TufPoodle Coach
Registered
#2
Yes Yank, that nut makes a difference. Set it "EXACTLY" where it was when you removed the cap.

Set your oil level without the spring.
 
#3
Yes Yank, that nut makes a difference. Set it "EXACTLY" where it was when you removed the cap.

Set your oil level without the spring.
Thanks:beerchug:
I figured out the jam nut as I sit here in the living room drinking coffee. It has to do with that Clicky Thing Screw Ma Jig LOL!!! When turned clockwise 20 clicks and threading on the round top thing a ma jig it should stop and then set the jam nut. Woooo Lahh measures 15.8MM
Took some time but figured it out,,, even with no youtube videos :laugh:

Thanks for the oil fill answer..

I will figure this suspension thing out sooner or later
 

Tufbusa

Track Coach / TufPoodle Coach
Registered
#4
You are on the right track dude! It's good to ask questions "Before" rather than "After" the install.

Just a little something to note on oil level. The function of the hydraulics work the same whether the oil level is an inch too high or an inch too low. The oil level is what regulates the amount of airspace within the tube. As the fork compresses the air is compressed creating resistance as the air pressure is increased. Acts like an overload spring. Us track junkies use oil levels to increase or decrease resistance in the forks when we find the spring is a little too soft or stiff. Fine tuning so-to-speak. Also, if you spend much time with the wheel in the air as I know you do, you may be wise to reduce the oil level by an ounce (About a table spoonful) which will make little difference in how your bike rides while making a significant difference on oil seal pressure.

A 1.1 spring is pretty stiff and even at your weight you may find your bike likes to eat front tires if you do a lot of hard cornering. I prefer a spring on the softer side for street use. A softer spring is much more forgiving on uneven pavement while a stiffer spring makes the bike react quicker to input and works best on a smooth surface.

When you get your goodies back together and installed, drop me a note if you like and I'll guide you through how to tell if your spring is compliant for your weight.
 
#8
You are on the right track dude! It's good to ask questions "Before" rather than "After" the install.

Just a little something to note on oil level. The function of the hydraulics work the same whether the oil level is an inch too high or an inch too low. The oil level is what regulates the amount of airspace within the tube. As the fork compresses the air is compressed creating resistance as the air pressure is increased. Acts like an overload spring. Us track junkies use oil levels to increase or decrease resistance in the forks when we find the spring is a little too soft or stiff. Fine tuning so-to-speak. Also, if you spend much time with the wheel in the air as I know you do, you may be wise to reduce the oil level by an ounce (About a table spoonful) which will make little difference in how your bike rides while making a significant difference on oil seal pressure.

A 1.1 spring is pretty stiff and even at your weight you may find your bike likes to eat front tires if you do a lot of hard cornering. I prefer a spring on the softer side for street use. A softer spring is much more forgiving on uneven pavement while a stiffer spring makes the bike react quicker to input and works best on a smooth surface.

When you get your goodies back together and installed, drop me a note if you like and I'll guide you through how to tell if your spring is compliant for your weight.
OK, here are the numbers..


Tempature is at 61 degrees in the garage.

Front wheel off the ground forks fully extended = 114.00 MM

These measurments are taken with MAX preload turned all the way in.

Bike weight, no rider= 87.25 MM
Suited Rider on bike in aggressive riding postion = 78.4 MM
Sag 8.85MM

Preload set at MIN all the way out.
Bike weight no rider= 77.80
Suited Rider on bike in aggressive riding postion= 61.30
Sag 16.5MM

So what do you make of this? :dunno:
 
#9
11MM
Why not just call and ask!
Hey John

When I took the measurment from OEM it measured 13.8MM....
Adjusting the rebound all the way in 20 clicks and then threading the piece on till it stopped with very torque, I moved the jam nut up and then unscrewed the piece, measuring the threads I got 13.8 as it was set from the factory. Thats why I asked not sure how the 11MM measurment was taken or the reason behind the -2.8MM +\- :dunno:
 
#11
You are on the right track dude! It's good to ask questions "Before" rather than "After" the install.

Just a little something to note on oil level. The function of the hydraulics work the same whether the oil level is an inch too high or an inch too low. The oil level is what regulates the amount of airspace within the tube. As the fork compresses the air is compressed creating resistance as the air pressure is increased. Acts like an overload spring. Us track junkies use oil levels to increase or decrease resistance in the forks when we find the spring is a little too soft or stiff. Fine tuning so-to-speak. Also, if you spend much time with the wheel in the air as I know you do, you may be wise to reduce the oil level by an ounce (About a table spoonful) which will make little difference in how your bike rides while making a significant difference on oil seal pressure.

A 1.1 spring is pretty stiff and even at your weight you may find your bike likes to eat front tires if you do a lot of hard cornering. I prefer a spring on the softer side for street use. A softer spring is much more forgiving on uneven pavement while a stiffer spring makes the bike react quicker to input and works best on a smooth surface.

When you get your goodies back together and installed, drop me a note if you like and I'll guide you through how to tell if your spring is compliant for your weight.
Tried sending you a message but got this "The following errors occurred with your submission
Tufbusa has exceeded their stored private messages quota and cannot accept further messages until they clear some space."

Delete some of your love letters / fan mail.:laugh:
 

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