2022 Busa Overheating

Rcktsientis99

Registered
So...Took home my 2022 Busa after Labor Day. Rode the bike daily to acclimate myself. After a <10 mi ride to work one morning, I shut off the bike temporarily while showing my credentials to enter the facility. When I hit the start button, the bike stalled. I didn't know why. I "walked" the bike out of traffic to the curb, waited about 30 seconds, hit the start button, and the bike started. When I got to my parking spot, about a mile away, I recreated exactly what I'd done previously, and the bike stalled again. This time, I took a look at the entire bike, and noticed the temp gauge needle was about to burst through the glass!! The bike was overheating like crazy! The needle was past the red zone!! The bike sat outside the entire day, and when I got on around 3:30 that afternoon to go home, the moment I started the bike, from cold BTW, the needle shot up to the 3/4 mark! 500 yds down the street and the needle was back in the red zone! I rode the bike home, called the dealer, and they picked up my bike the next morning. It's been at the dealership for 5 days and they have no idea what the issue is. Did I get a "pandemic lemon"?
 

Spudley

Grippin' and Rippin'
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On the generation one, we used to have to rock the bike left and right to displace all the bubbles prior to starting. I used to rock it back-and-forth while it was running as well.

I don't think you received a pandemic lemon. If they didn't fire the motor, initially, they would've never had the opportunity to notice that it was overheating.

A bunch of us made the request that the tech not start the bike.

I would also remove the right side fairing, take off the radiator cap, put the bike on the side stand and top off the fluid. Start it, and let it warm for a few minutes. With the bike leaning to the left the bubble will want to climb up the return line to the top of the radiator.

Then, make sure your radiator cap is properly attached. Run the motor for a few minutes and watch the temperature gauge.

last question: The fans were both spinning right?.
 

Rcktsientis99

Registered
On the generation one, we used to have to rock the bike left and right to displace all the bubbles prior to starting. I used to rock it back-and-forth while it was running as well.

I don't think you received a pandemic lemon. If they didn't fire the motor, initially, they would've never had the opportunity to notice that it was overheating.

A bunch of us made the request that the tech not start the bike.

I would also remove the right side fairing, take off the radiator cap, put the bike on the side stand and top off the fluid. Start it, and let it warm for a few minutes. With the bike leaning to the left the bubble will want to climb up the return line to the top of the radiator.

Then, make sure your radiator cap is properly attached. Run the motor for a few minutes and watch the temperature gauge.

last question: The fans were both spinning right?.
Fans were spinning hella fast/loud!!
 

sixpack577

Top Gun
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But I wonder which gen3 sensor(s) shut the bike off as an overheat safety?
Maybe an electronic failure is making the ecu think the engine is too hot when it really is ok?
I would lean towards that based on the dealer having the bike for 5 days with no info.
Either they haven't touched the bike(entirely possible) or;
The cannot replicate or consistantly replicate the problem.
Where if the problem were mechanical, pump driving coolant through a thermostat and radiator in a loop, that any issues from these failures would quickly and repeatedly be noticeable.
But that's just My guess for the moment, lol
 

Rcktsientis99

Registered
Likely the bike came dry (no fluids onboard) to the dealership. Their service department probably f***ed up when they were prepping the bike.

I believe yours is the first we've heard of a lemon potential re: Gen 3's
Bike just had the 600 mi break in service completed so I hope they didn’t miss this twice! Once during prep and again 3 weeks later during service.
 

QFry

Registered
If the techs did the Throttle Valve Synchronization there is a small possibility that they may have damaged or loosened the ECT sensor...but that is assuming that literally nothing else changed between putting 600miles on it and it suddenly showing problems (including air being introduced into system or thermostat/pump failing)

0.02$
 

WuzzaCBXRider

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I’m confused. Just how quickly can a motor overheat under the worst conditions? Surely it wouldn’t after riding just 500 yards right? Was your motor really overheating or was just the gauge saying so? If the gauge was off, whatever triggered it could’ve triggered the fans as well.
 

QFry

Registered
If it was shooting through the top like you say if it is like in picture [C] there are electrical problems.

Fans will turn on at an indicated 221f and increasing. Fans will turn off at 212f and decreasing. So it isn't a fan problem if the ECM is thinking it's a bit toasty.

Thermostat should open at 179.6f and be fully open at 203f... if the thermostat has failed shut, it could be the cause as well.

20210927_170224.jpg


20210927_171115.jpg
 

Rcktsientis99

Registered
I’m confused. Just how quickly can a motor overheat under the worst conditions? Surely it wouldn’t after riding just 500 yards right? Was your motor really overheating or was just the gauge saying so? If the gauge was off, whatever triggered it could’ve triggered the fans as well.
I agree with everything you're saying, but it doesn't explain why the bike would stall and not start. Unless the overtemp indication (not exactly overheating) would also cause the bike to stall, and if so, why would it eventually start? Wouldn't it just shut down and stay down? And the bike was super hot between my legs. I saw a YouTube video where the rider talked about "as large as the engine is, the bike doesn't feel hot between your legs." And I know that "heat" having ridden Harley's and being stuck in traffic.
 

Spudley

Grippin' and Rippin'
Donating Member
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If the radiator cap was faulty, you'd see bubbles in the overflow inside the fairing, right hand side, through the sight cut-out for the overflow.

That being said, you made mention that after a full days work the gauge went right up to 3/4 when you turned the key. That wreaks of temp send unit malfunction. The gauge is just reacting to the amount of resistance the sensor is indicating. Check the wiring connector, then pull sensor and test.
 

WuzzaCBXRider

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Well, we’re all guessing but I’d like to know how it ‘stalled’? Just die idling or stall when you let the clutch out to go? As for the heat on your legs, you shouldn’t have felt any in just 500 yards in normal weather but, w/o any riding gear, just jeans over skin? like many Harley riders wear, the heat can feel excessive. Compared to most big twins our motors are actually small and being water cooled, generally run much cooler.
 

QFry

Registered
So slight thread jack, found myself going down a rabbit hole yesterday and for anyone interested the bottom mark on the coolant temp gage 811ohm is ~50c (122f), the middle mark 142 ohm is ~100c (212f), and the top 111 ohm mark is ~120c (248f). The radiator cap begins to lift at 15.7 psi which at a 50/50 ratio and all things being normal would be about 135c (275f).
 

JeffSyh

Donating Member
Registered
I’m confused. Just how quickly can a motor overheat under the worst conditions? Surely it wouldn’t after riding just 500 yards right? Was your motor really overheating or was just the gauge saying so? If the gauge was off, whatever triggered it could’ve triggered the fans as well.
That what I was thinking... even if the system was 100% dry that seems oddly fast.
 
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