High output charging systems

Discussion in 'Powerhouse Motorcycles' started by POWERHOUSE, Jan 21, 2013.


  1. POWERHOUSE

    POWERHOUSE Frank Site Sponsor Registered

    Contests won:
    0
    Name:
    Frank
    POWERHOUSE is now offering high output charging setups for both the Gen 1 and Gen 2 Busas. The components are being offered separately. The Gen 1 and Gen 2 stators are 500W . . . 100W more than stock. The Gen 1 stators are rewound - so we require your stator as a core; the Gen 2 stators are new, no core required. Gen 1 high output stators are $175, and the Gen 2 stators are $160.

    For those of you who are concerned with heat issues and/or melted regulator plugs, we are offering "plug and play" MOSFET style regulators for both the Gen 1 and Gen 2, and we have recently added the newer version regulator for the 2013 and newer Busas. All versions of these regulator/rectifiers are 50 amp, and will be going for $155 each. These regulators run cooler than the old-style OEM regulators and do not melt plugs or heat up wires. We recommend these regulators with the higher output stators . . .:laugh:
     
  2. MLSDUKE1

    MLSDUKE1 Live from Mom's basement Registered

    Contests won:
    0
    Name:
    Luke
    Why is it $150 for Gen I with core and only $160 for Gen II without core? ???
     
  3. GNBRETT

    GNBRETT Registered

    Contests won:
    0
    sounds good. im in for one of those.
     
  4. POWERHOUSE

    POWERHOUSE Frank Site Sponsor Registered

    Contests won:
    0
    Name:
    Frank
    I actually expected the new stator for the Gen 2 to cost more because it's new and the Gen 1 stator to cost more because it's more work to rebuild on a core, but those are the numbers . . .:laugh:
     
  5. MLSDUKE1

    MLSDUKE1 Live from Mom's basement Registered

    Contests won:
    0
    Name:
    Luke
    That's what I was getting at. Those prices aren't bad at all! I was just expecting a wider range due to one having to be rewound and the other being brand new.
     
  6. POWERHOUSE

    POWERHOUSE Frank Site Sponsor Registered

    Contests won:
    0
    Name:
    Frank
    One thing I forgot to add which is very important when it comes to the differences between Gen 1 and Gen 2 when we are talking about these high-output stators, and also impacts on why they are priced this way:

    Gen 1: your stator is sent back to you ready to be installed in the cover - the ignition trigger is wired in, the grommet for the wires where they pass through the cover is installed, and the proper plugs are on the end, ready to be plugged directly into your harness.

    Gen 2: the new high-output stator for the Gen 2 has to be wired- the ignition trigger is NOT included, nor is the
    grommet or the two terminal trigger plug for the harness. The main three-wire stator plug is included, but not
    installed, so you can get your grommet on first. So, you have to harvest a trigger, a grommet and the trigger
    plug from another existing stator. BTW, these three items can be taken from a Gen 1 stator if necessary.

    Hopefully that clears it up a bit . . .:whistle:
     
  7. MLSDUKE1

    MLSDUKE1 Live from Mom's basement Registered

    Contests won:
    0
    Name:
    Luke
    It does, thank you!
     
  8. RYC1966

    RYC1966 Donating Member Registered

    Contests won:
    0
    Name:
    RYAN
    Watch your finger tips on the reinstall...the magnets pull the cover in quick
     
    ogre likes this.
  9. BusaINthaWinD

    BusaINthaWinD Registered

    Contests won:
    0
    how much for stator and regulator combo on gen 1
     
  10. POWERHOUSE

    POWERHOUSE Frank Site Sponsor Registered

    Contests won:
    0
    Name:
    Frank
    Sorry I forgot to mention in my first post that the new MOSFET regulators are $155, so a full setup - stator and regulator - for the Gen 1 will be $330, and the full setup for a Gen 2 will be $315. . .

    It should also be noted that these regulators are totally compatible with the stock charging systems on both bikes; they are "plug and play" and are a better choice than OEM . . .:beerchug:
     
  11. BusaINthaWinD

    BusaINthaWinD Registered

    Contests won:
    0
    awesome so when will you start taking orders? went to the website didnt see any info on it yet
     
  12. POWERHOUSE

    POWERHOUSE Frank Site Sponsor Registered

    Contests won:
    0
    Name:
    Frank
    We haven't had a chance to get it on our website as of yet, but nonetheless, POWERHOUSE has already been taking orders. Anybody looking for a Gen 1 high output 500 watt stator should get their core stator to us asap, there will be a week turnaround on those because our local customers cleaned us out already . . .:whistle:
     
  13. POWERHOUSE

    POWERHOUSE Frank Site Sponsor Registered

    Contests won:
    0
    Name:
    Frank
    DSCN0933.jpg DSCN0930.jpg

    The top pic is the Gen 1, bottom pic Gen 2. As previously stated, both stators are 500W and both regulators are MOSFET style 50A . . . :thumbsup:
     
  14. GIXERHP

    GIXERHP ok, ok...just a wee bit Irish... Donating Member Registered

    Contests won:
    0
    Name:
    JOHN HAYES
    Frank, are these the same as Ricks Electrics?
     
  15. POWERHOUSE

    POWERHOUSE Frank Site Sponsor Registered

    Contests won:
    0
    Name:
    Frank
    The stators are, and have been available for some time. The regulators are new, and were made at our request . . .
     
  16. Merlot

    Merlot Donating Member Registered

    Contests won:
    0
    Name:
    Mark
    Kindly share your better choice than OEM, in terms of???? More specific details please with thanks
     
  17. POWERHOUSE

    POWERHOUSE Frank Site Sponsor Registered

    Contests won:
    0
    Name:
    Frank
    Although I am not an electrical engineer, this is the simple difference:

    Standard regulators of the "thyristor" type control charging voltage by shutting the door on the flow of electricity and because of this, they generate heat. In the extreme, melted wires and connecting plugs are the result. MOSFET style regulators control the flow by accurately "switching" the flow on or off. This does not generate heat, and these regulators are cool to the touch as a result. No melted wires or plugs.

    There are electrical engineers and buffs on this site that can offer a better explanation than this one, I am sure. Right now, the MOSFET style regulator/rectifiers are better than most of the oem ones available . . .:laugh:
     
  18. GIXERHP

    GIXERHP ok, ok...just a wee bit Irish... Donating Member Registered

    Contests won:
    0
    Name:
    JOHN HAYES
    Very cool!
    Thanks for the reply!
     
  19. POWERHOUSE

    POWERHOUSE Frank Site Sponsor Registered

    Contests won:
    0
    Name:
    Frank
    Although the high output 500W stators have been available for a few years already, we have always been concerned about the amount of heat a stock regulator would make as a result of the increased wattage. Even the 40A regulator sold as a "match" to these high output stators seemed questionable to me, hence the move to go to the more efficient MOSFET style regulators. What follows is an explanation I plucked off another forum, hopefully it clears things up a bit if and when you decide to upgrade:

    What is the difference between a thyristor and a MOSFET based R/R?

    Metal Oxide Semiconductor makes MOS, and Field Effect Transistor makes FET... that is, both the name of the semiconductor type (semiconductor = diode, very loosely) and the actual type of circuit...

    The "diodes" that are used for switching to current to ground on and off are either thyristors, basically a diode with a third leg that acts as a switch, or MOSFETS, which are transistors functioning in a similar capacity.

    The switches in the Regulator part are either type, but they both do the same thing... The rapidly turn on and off, short circuiting power to ground to keep voltage constant... That's called "Shunting", and almost every type of bike regulator used now is made this way...

    Every time you short circuit something, it creates heat, just from the short circuit... That's the same for both types... But, the difference is in how you switch.

    On a thyristor based R/R the most heat isn't from the short circuit, it's from the switching... A thyristor is basically a diode with a separate leg, acting as a switch... But the switch has a delay... The thyristor relies on the current flowing through it, to keep it open...

    Basically the switch opens the door a crack, and then waits for the current to crash into the door, slamming it open... Closing it is similar... You slowly, slowly push the door closed enough until the current looses power and can't hold the door open, slamming it shut...

    As a result, the thyristor is horribly inexact and inefficient... It takes time to switch, and it creates huge amounts of heat while doing it...

    The MOSFET is a bit more intelligent... It doesn't rely on the current for opening the door, and it doesn't try to close it slowly... Instead the switch is really a switch... Switching it on means it starts to conduct fast, and switching it off means it stops almost as fast... That creates a lot less heat, and makes it more exact... A lot more exact...

    It's a very good upgrade, it's infinitely more robust than the crappy OEM one... And since it's specified for 50W, it's not working hard too keep up with demand, and that makes it age slower... So it will happily keep working twice the time an OEM one or a cheap OEM copy will... A MOSFET based R/R should never, ever fail from heat.

    As a result of this, a typical thyristor based R/R will produce 13.5-14.5V if it's healthy... And in semi healthy condition usually 13.2-14.8V... But depending on the temperature in the R/R, RPM and how fast the RPM changes it will swing wildly between these values at random...

    A MOSFET based R/R in new condition usually provides 13.5-14.5V, and in semi healthy condition (which takes about 20-30 times longer than the thyristor's to age into) the same 13.2-14.8V...

    But... And that's a pretty important but... The MOSFET R/R tends to go towards middle voltage at just off idle RPM, and then towards lower voltage at high RPM, with only small peaks towards higher voltage usually when the RPM's change... Also the swings are slower, more controlled...

    This means that as long as the battery is in good condition it has no problems coping with a semi reliable R/R of either type... But a thyristor based R/R will age it sooner, and ages itself sooner... And then you get problems...

    A MOSFET based R/R keeps the battery lasting longer, keeps the voltage more constant, which is good for the ECU/CDI, the electronics in the gauges, the fuses and also keeps the light bulbs in your headlight happy since it likes just above 14V to make peak light output (provided you have decent wiring to it)...

    Both types will make fireworks and smoke when they battery boils over if a diode in the Rectifier decides to go wide open, and both will stop charging the battery if it fuses... But a MOSFET Regulator takes a very, very long time to go "bad" enough to create the heat needed for damaging the Rectifier diodes... Corroded connectors are obviously something that affects both equally in terms of resistance/heat...

    Again, the effect and importance of a good regulator becomes even more apparent when the stator's output is increased, and with 100 more watts available, a more efficient regulator that runs cooler is a plus . . .:laugh:
     
  20. GIXERHP

    GIXERHP ok, ok...just a wee bit Irish... Donating Member Registered

    Contests won:
    0
    Name:
    JOHN HAYES
    Frank it is also what the GSXR's are do to stop the melting regulators! As well as they generally will upgrade to A R1 Regulator!
    The other big difference that you update the connectors to Sealed connectors, and also use Dielectric grease generously on the connectors to aid in any possible arcing.
     

Share This Page